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Day: February 1, 2013

Swimmers set sights on district meet

Alex Fox plows through the water. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Alex Fox plows through the water. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

With the district meet a scant week away, the McNary High School varsity swimming teams are taking it easier in practices in hope of claiming some surprise finishes.

“By having people that come in second and third and even fourth, we can shut the other teams out and get a good number of points to keep the meet within reach,” said Celt Jeremiah Hamilton.

“It’s crucial with districts coming up. It’s down to working hard, staying positive and being happy with how you swam,” added Kiona Briones, a McNary freshman.

Hamilton is hoping to make it to the podium in the 200 and 500 free races while Briones is looking to be a leader of the pack in the 100 breaststroke.


For more on this and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

One long achievement

Sandy and Hank Tarter were honored as the Keizer First Citizens Saturday, Jan. 26. For more winners, please see page 3. (KEIZERTIMES/Lyndon A. Zaitz)
Sandy and Hank Tarter were honored as the Keizer First Citizens Saturday, Jan. 26. For more winners, please see page 3. (KEIZERTIMES/Lyndon A. Zaitz)

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Hank and Sandy Tarter were more than willing to attend the Jan. 26 Keizer First Citizen Awards Banquet.

They just didn’t expect to be left speechless – and highly honored.

The Tarters were named Keizer’s First Citizens, several months after selling Keizer Collision Center on River Road to Kadel’s Auto Body.

The President’s Award went to Richard Walsh, who will be profiled next week.

“It was such a shock,” Hank said. “My mind went blank. Then I realized, ‘Oh criminy, we’re going to have to say something.’”

Sandy noted the couple had attended the banquet most years and Kadel’s was paying for their tickets. Besides, the couple had nothing else planned and had a chance to see old friends.

“It was no problem getting us there,” Sandy said. “But we never dreamed what was coming.”

Bob Zielinski, who won last year’s First Citizen Award along with wife Pam, started giving some details about this year’s recipients. Then some details like the winners owning a gold mine and their son having worked in the business came up.

“It started off kind of general,” Hank said. “Then it’s like, ‘Hey, wait a minute.’ He started saying some things and it started to get personal.”

Sandy started noticing that as well.

“We were in the Rotary,” she said. “We own a gold mine. Then I thought, ‘Uh-oh, this could be us.’ It’s just a huge honor. There are so many people out there more deserving.”

The Tarters moved to Keizer in 1975 but didn’t really feel connected to the city until opening their autobody shop in 1988.


For more on this and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Celts shoot out the lights in close loss

Celt Braden Taylor goes up for a shot in McNary’s game with North Salem High School Tuesday, Jan. 29. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Celt Braden Taylor goes up for a shot in McNary’s game with North Salem High School Tuesday, Jan. 29. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School boys basketball had one of its most stellar performances of the season last week, but the Celts still came up short in a 64-61 loss to West Salem High School Tuesday, Jan. 22.

The 17-2, eighth-ranked Titans took a slight early lead in the first quarter outshooting the Celts 21-16. The McNary team stayed in the game by draining three point goals like water from a bathtub.

By the end of the night, McNary put a dozen treys in the net with Celt Isaiah Montano leading the way with five en route to his team-leading 18 points for the night.

“We were knocking down our threes for the first time in the year. We shot about 70 percent from the foul line,” said Celt Johnathan Doutt, a junior.

Doutt had three three-pointers in the game and Devon Dunagan, Hayden McCowan, Hunter Christenson and Braden Taylor had one each.

“We shared the ball and shot like 50 percent from the field. We put in some new offensive plays and they worked really well,” Montano said.

Doutt was nipping at Montano’s heels with 15 points for the night; Taylor and Dunagan put in seven each; Connor Goff had four; McCowan and Christenson had three each; and Jon Kiser and Hayden Gosling had two points each.

By the end of the third quarter, the Celtics held a one-point lead over the Titans, 49-48. But a few rushed plays in the final minutes gave West just enough time and space to edge the McNary team, said Ryan Kirch, McNary head coach.


For more on this and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Growing (and parking) pains at Panera Bread

KEIZERTIMES/File photo
KEIZERTIMES/File photo

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Business has been better-than-expected at Panera Bread since the bakery café opened just before Christmas in Keizer Station.

That’s the good news. And the bad news.

The downside to the good business: there’s not enough parking.

Nate Brown, director of Community Development for Keizer, said he recently talked with the manager of Panera Bread, Denny Bauldree.

“He said the first week they did 20 percent more business than their most optimistic prediction,” Brown said.


For more on this and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Lady Titans snap Lady Celts three-win streak

McNary’s Jessica Darras gets a look at the hoop in McNary’s game with West Salem High School Jan. 22. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
McNary’s Jessica Darras gets a look at the hoop in McNary’s game with West Salem High School Jan. 22. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

From the start, McNary High School’s girls varsity basketball team knew it was going to be a tough week.

With games against the top two teams in the Central Valley Conference in the span of four days, the girls were facing a tall order and both ended in losses breaking, a three-win streak.

First up were the Titans Tuesday, Jan. 22. West Salem drowned out the Celts on offense as they leapt out to a 17-4 lead in the first quarter.

“We played hard in the first half, but we didn’t make a lot of our shots. The shots got better in the second half and we played really hard, but it just didn’t really work out,” said Celt Madie Hingston.

McNary was down 10 points with 6:30 left in the game.


For more on this and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Coal terminal projects

To the Editor:

Everybody in the Northwest should be interested in the proposed coal terminal projects.  At Port Westward, for example, Kinder Morgan will construct a $150 million terminal facility.  In order to ship the coal from Wyoming, the project will require that the rail lines be modernized to accommodate the weight and speed of traveling cargo.  As we continue to weigh these projects, there is one recurring thought that comes to mind: jobs, jobs, jobs.

Oregon’s construction industry has struggled more than any other during the Great Recession.  With unemployment rate well above the national and state averages, opportunities as alluring as these don’t come around too often.  For those concerned about the environment. Oregon’s development regulations are one of the strictest in the nation. If these projects have any major mishaps, our state agencies will discontinue their operation.

Let’s give the middle class a chance. Build terminals now.

Kenneth Morgan
Portland

Gun restrictions, not gun controls

By GENE H. MCINTYRE

Many older folks will remember the playground ditty of our youth, the one that read, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me.” Names may or may not hurt but the words we use in our daily discourse most certainly can and do.

I thought of the “sticks and stones” expression the other day while listening once again to a debate on what’s currently called gun control. Maybe calling gun control by some other name just might make progress towards bringing people together to turn the heat down, making America safer and more sane.

So, how about trying a re-name to “gun restrictions?”  Why? Because the intent as recognized by many Americans is to restrict the purchase of military-style assault weapons, magazines that exceed practical use limits, and to require thorough background checks wherever a gun is purchased. Meanwhile, it is not now nor has it ever been intended to take away hunting rifles and all handguns in an attempt to expunge the Constitution of its Bill of Rights, Amendment 2.

What many Americans want is that guns designed to take lives or kill people be made unavailable. Call me naïve if that makes the reader here happy; nevertheless, this measure would seem to be in the best interest of every law-abiding citizen in the country.

Some among us say they must have high-powered weapons because the government may decide any day now to break their doors down and enter their homes to take what they own and need for self protection. This strikes me as a straw man argument because, other than those persons who are suspected of breaking the law or are known to have broken it, the United States and its state and local level law-enforcement agencies do not, as anything like a general rule, arbitrarily break into and enter homes, much less without a warrant to legally permit it.

There is one other matter that deserves much more attention than it has received. That is the issue of mental health. We do rather poorly at making it easy for Americans to come forward to ask for counseling help to deal with their mental problems: So much of it at present comes with a stigma that can too often result in job loss, social ostracism and any other number of negative outcomes.

For the sake of bringing to some acceptable resolution the gun debate, it would seem to behoove us to find common ground or compromise that will minimize the hostility between the two sides that presently appear irreconcilable. After all, do we not fall into the hands of domestic and foreign terrorists when we fight among ourselves while they dedicate themselves to acts of violence against us?

(Gene H. Mclntyre lives in Keizer.)

City needs to focus on River Road

By EAMON BISHOP

The Keizertimes is a strong proponent of our city, much as Mayor Lore Christopher has a reputation for being a promoter of Keizer as well. The publisher must surely know of the perception held by many citizens that the Keizertimes is, in general, prejudiced in favor of our mayor and her political friends. That perception might be correct or it could be most inaccurate, but regardless of the truth, what of it?

A privately owned publication, its editor and its staff have every right to their political and cultural leanings. That is why some people read the New York Times while others read the New York Post. I certainly never read the Register-Guard while growing up in Eugene unless I needed to have my blood pressure elevated. Nobody could ever say that the Keizertimes doesn’t kindle passionate discussion on local matters.

What I do find to be an unfortunate attitude presented in the Keizertimes, in the actions and statements of our mayor, and certainly from some of our past and present city councilors is the ineffective approach to “promoting” and revitalizing the River Road shopping district. I have no experience in marketing, but even I can point out flaws in what city councilors and city leaders see as reasons to pat themselves on the back. As noted in your editorial, “Wave the Keizer banner,” River Road is indeed a heavily-traveled highway, but the majority of this traffic consists of Keizer citizens commuting to and from their places of employment, not of local or transient shoppers looking to spend money at River Road businesses. There is no prominence of drivers from out of town using River Road as a thoroughfare and thus being exposed to River Road’s commerce opportunities.

My opinion is that the only value of revamped River Road sidewalks and of sidewalk art displays is to provide what is probably the most beautiful spot in Oregon in which to stand and wait for a city bus. One rarely, if ever, sees a shopper park at one business lot, only to be drawn and seduced by the fancy sidewalk into a spur of the moment stroll with sudden intent to visit and spend money at a second establishment. The River Road corridor was festooned in the past with streetlamp-mounted banners. All we saw with that promotional attempt was the gradual fading and fraying of the fabric until the banners were finally removed. Christmas decorations along the roadway might need refurbishing, but even if these decorations did create a draw to River Road, they hang there for only six weeks.

I do not make these observations to in any way belittle ideas of others, as my ideas are not always the best themselves. I do know that the unfortunate and most damaging attitude that city leaders have toward developing, funding and promoting the privately-owned Keizer Station area is strangling at an ever increasing rate any chance of success of the River Road district. The fact that the city chose to favor the Keizer Station developments over the River Road area when transferring monies from one fund to the other speaks volumes. City leaders and the council might respond that the funds have since been repaid, but it is the actions of the city that clearly demonstrate where their priorities and misguided loyalties reside.

We could pave River Road with gold, but customer spending and new development along the highway would still not increase. The reason for this is the fact that the city apparently does not understand and will not commit to dealing with the most important problems damning the area, which is the lack of effective promotion, support, and by far most important, the provision of efficient traffic access to River Road via Interstate 5. Despite past suggestions by the public, the city has still not made the minimal investment of placing visible signage along the I-5/Lockhaven Drive corridor indicating to out-of-area Keizer Station shoppers that the River Road business district even exists.

Keizer’s leaders might defend their abandonment of River Road businesses with such reasoning as a desire to develop the Keizer Station area in order to provide employment for local residents. They might speak of their opinion that there is need to focus on Keizer Station development as a means to increase the tax base to support new growth. Reasoning such as this rings hollow if the city is aiming to provide possible new employment in one area rather than supporting local businesses and their existing employees in the other. The need for growth in our tax base is a gray area at best, as Keizer residents have not yet formally decided whether future growth is wanted or necessary.

The bottom line in the discussion about sidewalks and banners is this: A majority of our city councilors and city leaders need to change their culture of belief that they are in place to direct us and to dictate development plan. There must come understanding of the simple principle that local government exists to support and be guided by the people, in this case our River Road business owners. Some members of our council have been in office for years, yet this concept continues to elude them. If the city of Keizer does not provide firm commitment to take measurable, effective action to rightfully support and develop the River Road area, we will have a large, ugly, decaying and shameful district running through the heart of a once proud town.

(Eamon Bishop lives in Keizer.)

John Burton Hunter

John B. Hunter
John B. Hunter

John Burton Hunter passed away in Hurricane, Utah, on January 28, 2013, at the age of 80 years.

He was born on Nov. 22, 1932, in Cedar City, Utah, to Lorenzo and Gwendolyn Hunter. The home in which he was born is now known as the Hunter House Museum located at Frontier Homestead State Park in Cedar City.

John spent early years of his life living in Cedar City and then Oneida, N.Y. It was there he joined the army with two of his brothers and served during the Korean War. After military service he moved to Santa Monica, California. This is where he eventually met his future wife Carolyn. They were married in 1959. Soon after, they moved to Oregon to raise their family. For a brief time they lived in Bend and Salem. However it was the community of Keizer where they spent 35+ years living.

John at first was in insurance sales. Soon after, he went into the bicycle business as owner of Salem Bike & Sport. The shop not only supported the family but also sponsored several road racing teams, bicycle motocross riders and skateboard teams and individuals.

He had several hobbies and interests including painting, fishing, gardening, reading, studying family history and traveling the Pacific Northwest.

John was and still is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He served in many capacities including a mission to Virginia and North Carolina, a bishop and stake high counselor. He had a testimony of Jesus Christ, and followed His teachings to love one’s neighbors and care for others.

At John’s request, no general services will be held. He wanted to keep it simple. A graveside service will take place at his burial at the Cedar City Cemetery for immediate family.

John had many friends throughout his life and loved to serve. He will be missed and we know he is now in a better place. It’s comforting to know we will be with him again some day.

He is survived by his wife Carolyn, his children Roseanne, Brian, Brent, Diane, five grandchildren and step brother James Van Patten. John is preceded in death by his parents, brothers Sidney, Lorenzo and Harry and sisters Hazel, Hilda, Betty and Gloria.

Online condolences can be sent at www.spilsburymortuary.com.