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Day: February 4, 2013

The key to parkour? Free your mind, the rest will follow

Wyatt Hooper sails over an obstacle at the new Keizer gym, Parkour Infinity. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Wyatt Hooper sails over an obstacle at the new Keizer gym, Parkour Infinity. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

It should be more nerve-wracking to watch Corey Jones leap down off a 12-foot wall, but it’s his posture that sets spectators at ease.

His arms float out to the side and his legs stay bent as he rolls onto the ground and back to his feet. There’s no question he’s done it before, likely from much greater heights, and no doubt that he’ll survive it this time.  In a way the single feat is an embodiment of what he hopes to teach others with his new Keizer gym, Parkour Infinity, 3606 Cherry Avenue N.E.

“At its core, parkour is overcoming obstacles – physical or mental. We’re trying to separate ourselves from the things that stand in the way of reaching our goals,” Jones said.

For the uninitiated, parkour is that thing you’ve likely seen in videos online or in commercials of people flying over stair railings, leaping between buildings, or scampering up walls with Spider-Manlike agility.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

“The One I Left Behind” by Jennifer McMahon

One-I-Left-Behind

“The One I Left Behind” by Jennifer McMahon
c.2013, William Morrow
$14.99 / $16.99 Canada 423 pages

 

BOOK REVIEW
by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER

Once upon a time, your parents diapered your behind.

They didn’t mind, though, because it was part of being a parent. They fed you, cleaned up after you, put clothes on your little body, toys in your bedroom, and lessons in your head. They made meals, curfews, and sacrifices.

Someday, you may need to repay the favor, although it may not be pleasant. In fact, in the new novel “The One I Left Behind” by Jennifer McMahon, it may come at a bigger price than one might think.

Thirty-nine-year-old Reggie Dufrane never wanted to return to Monique’s Wish.

The old stone house was once a labor of love, built by Reggie’s grandfather for his wife, Monique, who died in childbirth. It was supposed to be a gift, but Reggie only saw it as a place to escape forever.

She never wanted to return. But when her Aunt Lorraine phoned, she had no choice.

Twenty-five years ago, Reggie’s mother, Vera, was the final victim of a serial killer that the media dubbed Neptune. Though they never found her body, they found Vera’s right hand, amputated neatly, the calling card of a killer.

But Vera was very much alive. She’d been living in a homeless shelter all those years, and now she was dying of cancer. Lorraine demanded that Reggie bring Vera to Monique’s Wish for her final days, though returning to a life’s worth of bad memories was something Reggie didn’t want to do.

In retrospect, Vera hadn’t been a good parent. Reggie spent more time with her aunt than with her mother because Vera loved to drink. Lorraine resented that, and she seemed to resent Reggie, too. Because she felt unloved, and because of a childhood injury, Reggie grew up self-conscious, self-destructive, and unable to resist peer pressure from a reckless supposed-best friend. It had taken a long time to overcome that. She didn’t want to return to it.

But the fact of the matter was that her mother was alive, and dying. The other fact was that Neptune was never caught and vulnerable Vera was still in danger.

Then again, so was Reggie…

I really have to stop reading books like this before bedtime.

I was okay until I got about a quarter-way through it. But then author Jennifer McMahon made me jump and, well, helloooo nightmares.

Though there are some rough spots in editing and a little bit of initial back-and-forth confusion in timeline, “The One I Left Behind” is a pretty fine thriller. The characters are a creepy bunch, even when you may think they’re not supposed to be. There are lots of distractions here to keep you guessing, and plenty of dead ends that should easily foil early-solvers. In fact, I didn’t know where McMahon was going until almost the end of this book, which was mighty satisfying.

So if you need to scare up a few scares, this book should be your next read need. For lovers of a high Creep Level, “The One I Left Behind” won’t be left behind anywhere.

Terri Schlichenmeyer is based in Wisconsin.

Worth making it

Kiara Richardson (left) presents Gillian Herndon, Tom Fischer, and Larry Bent of McNary Golf  Club with Merchant of the Year honors. (KEIZERTIMES/Lyndon A. Zaitz)
Kiara Richardson (left) presents Gillian Herndon, Tom Fischer, and Larry Bent of McNary Golf
Club with Merchant of the Year honors. (KEIZERTIMES/Lyndon A. Zaitz)

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Gillian Herndon wasn’t planning to be at Keizer’s First Citizen Awards Banquet Jan. 26.

After all, the operations manager at McNary Golf Club was busy watching her son in a two-day basketball tournament in McMinnville.

A variety of people tried to discreetly get Herndon to attend the banquet, knowing the 50-year-old golf club would be earning Merchant of the Year honors.

“My children come first,” Herndon said. “There was panic all around, from what I heard, when I couldn’t make it. Even my husband was involved with trying to make me go. They tried everything. Finally the chamber board president told me why I had to go.”

Being told beforehand didn’t lessen the shock for Herndon, who was introduced by last year’s winner, Audrey Butler.

“I was surprised that I won it,” said Herndon, who shared the award with co-workers Tom Fischer, president of the board of directors and Larry Bent, pro shop manager. “It’s a great honor. I was flabbergasted. I don’t feel I do anything special. There are so many more people in the community that do things more important, as I deem them. Things I do are just stuff I did for me.”


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Familiar faces recycled

Brandon Smith and Mark Cailier
Brandon Smith and Mark Caillier

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Mark Caillier and Brandon Smith are no longer on the Keizer City Council.

The two are making up for gained time by joining more committees.

Caillier was appointed by Mayor Lore Christopher to the Volunteer Coordinating Committee (VCC), which recommends volunteers to various city committees.

In January, the VCC appointed Smith to one of two open positions on the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board, a nomination that still needs to be confirmed by the current council.

During the Jan. 17 VCC meeting, Caillier and Smith were both appointed to the Stormwater Advisory Committee. They were the only two who applied for the two open seats. The nominations are being forwarded to council for approval.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 1 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.