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Day: February 8, 2013

Streaking Celts collide with league leaders

Lady Celt Teresa Peterson finds a gap between two McKay High School players in the game Tuesday, Feb. 5, at McNary High School. The Celts won 62-29, the team’s third win in a row. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Lady Celt Teresa Peterson finds a gap between two McKay High School players in the game Tuesday, Feb. 5, at McNary High School. The Celts won 62-29, the team’s third win in a row. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

After a week of two losses, the McNary High School girls varsity basketball team rebounded to pick up two Central Valley Conference wins.

The Lady Celts were third in the league with a record of 5-3 headed into the final week of CVC competition. After a scheduled game with McKay High School Tuesday, Feb. 5, McNary was slated to finish the regular season with a match-up against West Salem High School Friday, Feb. 8.

“I think if we play as hard as we all know we can, and go as hard as we can on defense, we’ll stay right there with (the Titans) and make it tough on them,” said Celt Ashlee Koenig.

A win in the game could be a season-changer for the Celtics, and a feather in the cap for Head Coach Paul Pickerell, who left his role as an assistant coach in the Titan program to take the reins at McNary.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 8 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Celts dismantle Tigers

Celt Caleb Connor tugs at Tiger Gavin Roche’s wrist as he tries to roll him over for a pin. Connor won the match by pin in the third round. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Celt Caleb Connor tugs at Tiger Gavin Roche’s wrist as he tries to roll him over for a pin. Connor won the match by pin in the third round. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

According to their coach, the McNary High School varsity wrestling team’s goals have been narrowed to four.

Job 1: Get on the podium at regionals.

Job 2: Getting into the state tournament.

Job 3: Winning a match at state.

Job 4: Getting on the podium at state.

“This is the time to shine,” said Jason Ebbs, McNary head coach. “We’ve spent the past three months taking care of everyone’s bodies, showing them the moves and the strategies, now we start taking care of their minds and reaching the goals we set at the beginning of the season.”

The Celts begin the regional tournament at Tualatin High School Friday, Feb. 8. The first whistles sound at noon.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 8 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Boys still seeking league win

McNary’s Johnathan Doutt scambles around North Salem’s DaShawn Keebler in the game Tuesday, Jan. 29. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
McNary’s Johnathan Doutt scambles around North Salem’s DaShawn Keebler in the game Tuesday, Jan. 29. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School boys varsity basketball team continued its struggle through a tough season with two losses last week.

The boys fell to North Salem High School 63-50 and Sprague High School 62-49. While the team has yet to break a losing skid since the beginning of Central  Valley Conference play, Head Coach Ryan Kirch had high hopes for games against the McKay and West Salem high schools this week.

“They’re both teams that we’ve had leads on going into the last four minutes of the game the first time around and it’s an opportunity to build some confidence headed into the seeding tournament next week,” Kirch said.

The team’s conference record, 0-8, doesn’t reflect the narrow misses they’ve had, but the outcomes of each have come down to the final minutes of nearly every game.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 8 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Blazing a trail

(Photo courtesy of J&H Photo)
(Photo courtesy of J&H Photo)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

If our character is revealed when we think others aren’t looking, then Devin Reynolds’ actions at a dual meet Jan. 31 say more about him as a person than the wrestling phenom he’s become the past three years.

The night began with Celt freshman Joey Kibbey taking on Tigard High School’s Brad Williams. It was a brief, hard-fought match that Kibbey won by pin in the first round. Kibbey was ecstatic, pumping his fists in the air and bounding back to the edge of the mat to receive high-fives from teammates.

As he reached the end of the line, there was Reynolds in a red jacket and jeans, sitting out the night because of illness. Reynolds grabbed Kibbey and wrapped him in a hug; he took Kibbey by the shoulders and offered more words of encouragement.

“I like being able to show him how to be proud of the wins. Showing my care, I hope, means something for him. When Joey’s working hard up (in the practice gym), he’s the boss. Everybody on my team is awesome and I like being that type of person they can look up to,” Reynolds said. “I don’t want to be one of those ego guys. I’m just Devin. I want to be the type of guy my teammates can come up to when they want help. I wouldn’t be where I was if I didn’t have other people helping me.”

Help for Reynolds has come from all corners and he’s every bit the athlete and contender he deserves to be on the mat, but his humility and graciousness is the thing harder to pin down. It counterweights and balances the physique that defies all expectations for an 18-year-old body and the collection of trophies and medals that would wobble the sturdiest of shelves. It comes from somewhere else. Somewhere that isn’t trained, but lived, and Reynolds’ accomplishments–which include a state and world title–are merely the outward proof of his inner mettle.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 8 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Fee waivers at city hall raise questions

KEIZERTIMES/File photo
KEIZERTIMES/File photo

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

The Keizer First Citizen Awards Banquet at Keizer Civic Center on Jan. 26 was a feel-good event.

However, some don’t feel so good about the location or the process that was used.

For the fourth year, the banquet, once again put on by the Keizer Chamber of Commerce, was held in the conference center at the civic center on Chemawa Road.

Before 2010, the event was held up the road at the Renaissance Inn conference center.

In December Rob Miller, past president of the chamber, asked the Keizer City Council to waive room fees for the event. The year before, the Keizer Rotary allowed the chamber free use of the room for the banquet as one of several events it gets to host for free each year thanks to paying for construction of the room.

In a somewhat unusual move, councilors voted on the issue – which was not on the agenda – Dec. 17. Usually items brought up during public comment aren’t voted on until they’re on the agenda for the next meeting.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the Feb. 8 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

New look needed at booking Center

The conference center at the Keizer Civic Center has been a success and it operates as it was designed.

Mayor Lore Christopher and other city leaders envisioned the conference center to be a space to be used both for community organizations to use and as a generator of revenue from other groups.

This week the city council approved waivers of rental fees for two non-profit groups on Saturday nights in March and April. The civic center was built with taxpayer money so it is right to offer waivers for local, Keizer-based non-profit organizations. When waivers are given, the renting organizations usually pay for city employees to staff the rooms during the event, security and cleaning deposits.

Non-profit organizations do good works in the community and should get some fee relief, yet when they book a Saturday it blocks a potential full-price renter. Though it is a public community conference center it should be able to generate enough revenue to pay its own way.

The city will be addressing the rate schedule again for the conference center in the near future. The current rates allow for any group to book a room at the confererence center for $15 for Tuesday’s public days. Unfortunately there have been some non-community groups that have been allowed to take advantage of the public day fee.

Who should be eligible for the $15 community rate on Tuesdays? It should be limited to Keizer-based non-profit organizations, such as youth sports groups and churches. Government agencies and for-profit businesses and groups should not be eligible for the reduced fee.

Many community events are booked for the conference center on Saturday nights. Fees are waived for many of these—the Keizer Chamber Banquet, the McNary Fine Arts Madrigal Dinner, Keizer Young Life event to name a few. Instead of a Saturday night (when another customer could be paying the full rental rate) some of these groups could opt for a Monday or a Friday night. Keizer is generally not a late night kind of town—the streets are quiet after 9 p.m., so having a community event on a Monday or a Friday would be a good alternative.

Many families are busy on Saturday nights either with other plans or out of the town. Attendance at community events could actually be healthier if held on a night other than a Saturday; most of the community events rarely run past 10 p.m. If a community group books the conference center on a night other than Saturday they should then be eligible for full waivers.

Though the conference center is a public space the city should get as much revenue from it as it can. The city can tinker with the rates and waivers, they should also be proactive in persudaing community groups to choose nights that are historically not rented.

—LAZ

You might be a hypochondriac if…

By NICK THOMAS

The older I get, the more anxious I become about personal illness. When I was in my twenties, I never gave much thought to every odd ache or pain—it was mostly just “a muscular thing.” But today when I experience a sudden twinge, I’m sure its major organ failure.

So, if I may channel Jeff Foxworthy along these lines, you too might be a hypochondriac if ….

• You’re afraid to go fishing in case you catch something.

• Every birthday, you treat yourself to a spa, massage, and MRI.

• You continually pester your pharmacist to email you when the FDA approves a home colonoscopy kit.

• On vacations, you check into the hospital before the hotel.

• Your favorite reference web site is Sickipedia.

• You plan on attending Hypochondriac Anonymous meetings, but always phone in sick.

• You dread going to the supermarket in case a cashier asks if you’re ready to check out.

• When offered TicTacs, you explain that you can only take two every four hours, after meals, with a glass of water.

• You have more doctors than friends.

• There are some TV shows you can never watch, like “Deadliest Catch.”

• You swear you heard the doctor whisper to the nurse “we’ll know more after the autopsy.”

• Your cell phone plugs into a stethoscope.

• For recreation, you touch up your X-rays with Photoshop.

• Drug dealers regularly visit your home, but they’re from Pfizer, Merck, or Johnson & Johnson.

• Your favorite bedtime story to read to the kids is “Goldilocks and the Three Bayers.”

• You wear a medical gown to bed.

• You live in fear of back injury whenever you jump to conclusions.

• You don’t believe laughter is the best medicine; it’s morphine.

 

• You’re too scared to use Preparation H because you wonder what was wrong with Preparations A-G.

• You believe you suffer from several previously unknown ailments including: Mississippi Ladybug Fever, Fatal Late-night TV Insomnia, Bookworm, Lemon-Lime Disease, and Irritable Spouse Syndrome.

• You avoid roofers for fear of shingles.

• Each Valentine’s Day you send a card to your cardiologist.

• Your family has to eat meals off a physician’s examination table in your dining room.

• And, you might just be a hypochondriac, if you ask to be buried with a first aid kit.

(Thomas’ features and columns have appeared in more than 270 magazines and newspapers. He can be reached at his blog: http://getnickt.blogspot.com.)

Sequester will grow economy

By LAWRENCE KUDLOW 

Last week’s report of a 0.1 percent gross domestic product decline for the fourth quarter came as a surprise to most forecasters. But it actually masks considerable strength in the private economy. Namely, housing investment in the fourth quarter jumped 15.3 percent annually, business equipment and software spiked 12.4 percent, and real private final sales rose 2.6 percent. All in all, the domestic private sector of the economy increased 3.4 percent annually —a very respectable gain.

And here’s one for the record books: Working ahead of year-end tax hikes, individuals shifted so much money to the fourth quarter at the 35 percent top rate that personal income grew by 7.9 percent annually—a huge number. And there’s more: In order to beat the taxman, dividend income rose 85.2 percent annually. You think tax incentives don’t matter? Guess again.

Now, all this private-sector strength occurred despite the fact that government spending—namely, military spending—dropped 6.6 percent. Inventories also lost ground, and the trade deficit widened.

But here’s a key point: Military spending has now fallen virtually to its lower sequester-spending-cut baseline. It did so in one quarter by about $40 billion. So the brunt of the impact over the coming years has already been felt. (Normally, as of recent years, military spending has been virtually flat.)

Which leads me to another key point: Even with the fourth-quarter contraction, the latest GDP report shows that falling government spending can coexist with rising private economic activity. This is an important point in terms of the upcoming spending sequester. Lower federal spending, limited government and a smaller spending-to-GDP ratio will be good for growth. The military spending plunge will not likely be repeated. But by keeping resources in private hands, rather than transferring them to the inefficient government sector, the spending sequester is actually pro-growth.

Big-government Keynesians think big spending provides big growth. They are wrong. This has been a 2 percent recovery—the worst in modern times—dating back to 1947. So let’s try something different. Let’s shrink government. Let’s let the private sector breathe and generate entrepreneurship and risk-taking.

Spending is the true tax measure of the economy, according to Milton Friedman, Friedrich Hayek and others. Even a modest sequester spending cut of maybe $60 billion in 2013, and perhaps more than $1 trillion over 10 years (most of which will come from a slower spending growth rate, not real reductions), will be the best thing to inspire business and market confidence as well as international credibility. And it maybe even shave a point or two off the spending share of GDP.

On March 1, the spending sequester is supposed to kick in by law. If Congress wants to help the U.S. economy, the best thing it can do right now is implement this sequester. Then it can round out an even larger growth package, including large- and small-business tax reform and adjustments to stop entitlements from going bankrupt.

(Creators Syndicate)

Immigration issue is economic issue

By GENE H. McINTYRE

There is much in this country over which we divide ourselves.  Think guns, abortion, global warming, warring overseas, the environment, conservation, and a whole host of other matters that end-up “heating” people to the boiling point while acts of violence more and more often occur over who’s right.

One issue that could unite us is immigration.  Yes, many among us consider the conversion of so-called illegals to fast-track status, ultimately leading to citizenship, without returning to country of origin to apply for it and wait in line, is not in our best interest, while others, perhaps of “cooler” mind, see this action as a means by which assimilation can take place, as “about time.”  It is then, to some, the means by which to make the guesstimated 11 million undocumented into “whole” Americans, a victory for human dignity.

In the meantime, it is argued that increased immigration boosts the U.S. economy.  For example, Hamilton Project research has found that immigrants are 30 percent more likely to start new businesses than native-born Americans and also, among them, to secure patents.  Further, it’s reported that 25 percent of recently-established, new high-tech companies have been founded by the foreign-born, earning each in the $1 million range of sales.

Most Americans are keen on job development, motivated in their thoughts on the subject by our chronic plus or minus 8 percent unemployment.  One study by an economics professor at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia, found that for every additional 100 foreign-born workers in science and technology, 252 additional jobs were made available for U.S. natives.

The labor of low-skill immigrants has been found to help significantly with the cost of food, homes and child care.  Often, too, living standards can rise as more native-born women can afford to work outside the home.

Immigrants are doing quite well at assimilating, too, with almost all the children of immigrants from Africa and Asia speaking English as more than 90 percent of the children of Latin American immigrants do.  It has been determined also that while new immigrants usually start out disproportionately in common labor and food-service work, by their second and third generations they are little different in the labor force from the native-born.

Then there’s the carry-your-own-weight concern where it’s “conventional wisdom” that the states and localities must spend precious tax dollars to educate and health care them.  This has been determined true at the beginning of their arrival; yet, ultimately, they pay more in taxes than they receive in benefits.  The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office has determined that giving the current illegal immigrants a way to citizenship would increase the taxes they pay by $48 billion and increase the cost of public services they use by $23 billion, establishing a surplus amount in the $25 billion range.

Another study on a related issue by the Economic Policy Institute reports that the wages of most low-skill workers are probably not significantly affected by the immigrants.  It has been shown according to the Institute that the immigrant workers usually do not directly compete with the native-born, and often, too, enable the native-born to move up into jobs that require more communication knowledge from having been born and raised in the U.S.

Believe it or not, with the aging populations of the industrialized nations, there’s a somewhat low-key competition to win the global talent race.  Over the last decade, it has become known, more than half of the world’s nations have as national policy to increase their immigrant numbers, especially for highly skilled immigrants, many of which the U.S. now trains and educates but who are asked to leave after they graduate.

At present, we are below the successful immigrant numbers nations like Australia and Canada attract.  We are on par with France and Germany.  Our immigrant entrepreneurs are not active in high-tech startups anything like those either in Australia and Canada.

We’ve always considered ourselves superior to our neighbor to the north and that ally of ours that is a continent in its own right.  Yet, the facts lead to the conclusion that we are stagnating and need to build on our once self-proclaimed but proven-true-standing as the most dynamic economic engine in the world.  We could also do much better at tailoring immigrant intake to regional labor markets that favor high-skill workers, something Canada does exemplarily well.

In the meantime, as is the desire of those in D.C. who favor immigration reform, we need to control our borders much, much better and require our institutions, agencies, businesses, large and small, and our corporations to hire only documented workers: Conditions of entry and employment that are done so much more effectively by the vast majority of countries overseas.  Meanwhile here, if we proceed as we have done so over the past several years, doing hit –and-miss work for the most part on our borders and allowing, often without even light slaps on the wrist for violations, those who hire anyone regardless of citizenship or green card status, then we’ll continue to do what we’ve always done and thereby most likely get what we’ve always got.

(Gene H. McIntyre lives in Keizer.)