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Day: March 15, 2013

Turnout doubles for boys tennis

McNary’s Jonah Bracken, one of the new faces on the Celtic boys varsity tennis team, returns a volley in practice. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
McNary’s Jonah Bracken, one of the new faces on the Celtic boys varsity tennis team, returns a volley in practice. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School boys varsity tennis team has lots of new faces this season on the roster and  coaching staff.

“It’s been a great turnout” said Aaron Wenning, a senior and captain of the team. “We’ve got like 10 more players and two more coaches.”

Wenning won his first match of the district tournament last year, but ended up battling to a loss in the second round.

“Aaron has really worked on his game this winter and is playing better then ever,” said Lisa Reid McNary head coach.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the March 15 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Girls tennis returns smarter, ready for wins

 

Lady Celt Rachel Morrow returns a ball in practice last week. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Lady Celt Rachel Morrow returns a ball in practice last week. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

After making it to the doubles teams quarterfinals at the district tournament last year, Lady Celts Delaney Engle and Alison McGregor started taking their tennis game more seriously. They started practicing year-round.

“We really tried to focus on being more consistent in our technique,” said McGregor.

“And the little things like ball placement,” added Engle.

The pair return to the court this season having added to their on-court repertoire and looking to improve on last year’s finish.

Mark Kohley, head coach of the McNary High School girls varsity tennis team, thinks the pairing is going to be a formidable force on the court this season.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the March 15 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Zielinski murder trial postponed

Peter Zielinski
Peter Zielinski

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

The Peter Zielinski murder trial has been pushed back again, this time to September.

Peter John Zielinski has been charged with murder with firearm for the Jan. 12, 2011 killing of his wife, Lisa Zielinski.

Peter’s attorneys entered a not guilty plea based on extreme emotional disturbance in the fall of 2011.

In late 2011, a jury trial was scheduled for May 2012, but that was pushed back. Last June, a trial for this March was scheduled.

Jury selection was scheduled to take place Friday, March 15 with a week-long trial scheduled to start Monday, March 18.

Doug Hanson, the Marion County deputy district attorney handling the case, told the Keizertimes March 14 plans changed at the last minute.

“We just found out the trial is being continued,” Hanson said. “There will be no jury selection (Friday). This is not what anyone wanted to happen.”

Hanson said he couldn’t disclose the reason for the delay.

“This came out of the blue,” he said.

Hanson confirmed this week the trial has been pushed back to late summer.

Jury selection is now expected to take place Thursday, Sept. 5 with opening statements scheduled for the following day.

The trial is expected to continue through the following week.

“It was unexpected for both sides,” Hanson said of the latest delay. “It’s unfortunate it is out so far. It’s a scheduling thing. It’s especially unfortunate for the victim’s family, since it’s been more than two years. I think everyone wanted some closure.”

Jon Weiner, Peter Zielinski’s attorney, did not return messages for comment.

Learning to see like the saints and poets

Alyssa Johnson and Nick Neddo make their first romantic connections as leads Emily Webb and George Gibbs in the Celtic production of Our Town. The play open March 15. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Alyssa Johnson and Nick Neddo make their first romantic connections as leads Emily Webb and George Gibbs in the Celtic production of Our Town. The play open March 15. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

The actors in McNary High School’s production of Our Town want your undivided attention for their upcoming run. But their goal is make you leave the Ken Collins Theater appreciating everything you took for granted before you walked in.

The Thornton Wilder play depicts some days in the lives of fictional Grover’s Corners residents centering on Alyssa Johnson’s Emily Webb and Nick Neddo’s George Gibbs. It’s told without a set or props, but that is part of the play’s bag of tricks.

The thing that brought the play to life for Johnson and Neddo was an exercise that involved passing around a red ball while rehearsing their lines.


For more of this article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the March 15 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Council of process

Lore Christopher and Ken LeDuc
Lore Christopher and Ken LeDuc

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

What happens to a Keizer City Councilor who steps out of line in dealing with the public?

According to Mayor Lore Christopher, the answer is simple: nothing.

During a work session Monday night, Christopher asked that a process be started, detailing what happens if a councilor needs to be reprimanded or disciplined in some way.

The topic was brought up in response to a complaint Christopher received from an Eagle Scout parent last Saturday regarding an interaction with councilor Ken LeDuc.

“We have no process for dealing with it,” Christopher said. “If we act inappropriately, there is no process. There is nothing that says how we come to a decision. I think that starts with us. We need to police ourselves.”


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the March 15 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Let’s get Keizer ready

Everyone is waiting for something to happen in our economy. We are waiting for some sign that everything is okay again and everyone can get back into the pool.

Corporate America is in a holding pattern, unwilling to do what it does best-—invest and innovate—until uncertainty about taxes and regulations are settled. That mindset affects Keizer, too.

We have had some new business construction in Keizer, but not enough to allow the city to grow and increase its tax base. Panera Bread has been added and Outback Steakhouse is being built in Keizer Station. Salem Radiology Consultants is on deck to build a new clinic at Lockhaven Drive and McLeod Lane, but the economic conditions still are not right for that project to get underway.  An agreement has been reached between developers and neighbors regarding the mixed used project in Area C at Keizer Station to move ahead, but no tenants have been signed.

Mayor Lore Christopher has been pushing Keizer as an attractive location for the health care industry to build clinics, laboratories and offices. That desire is hampered by the financial issues that Salem Health and Silverton Health are facing—both have announced budget cuts over the past few months.

Keizer can become Marion County’s second medical hub after the area around Salem Hospital. The city offers location and convenience. With a smart expansion of the Urban Growth Boundary Keier will also offer more land. Smart expansion would be a light industrial-office park-medical zoned expansion north of Keizer Station along Interstate 5.

Keizer needs to be ready to address the needs of corporate America once it is ready to expand again. We need to position the city as the preferred location for new development and then recruit the types of businesses that will add quality, non-polluting, green jobs.

When President Obama and Congress finally come to some rational agreement about spending, deficits and debt, we should expect to see the pent-up demand for new business construction take off like a rocket. That’s what businesses are saying, anyway.

What goes on in Washington, D.C. is important to the far-flung communiites like Keizer. We want to add to our tax base, we want to add good jobs for Keizer residents. That’s why everyone has a vested interest in what goes on in the nation’s capital. We all have an interest in Congress and the president hammering out a deal that is good for the nation, and that means good for the public and good for business.

Keizer cannot force businesses to buy land, break ground and build a new structure.  What the city and its civic leaders can do is prepare ourselves for when business is at the door ready to call Keizer home.

—LAZ

A hero of the Keizer Library

To the Editor:

Keizer resident Steve Prothero was recently elected to the Willamette University Athletic Hall of Fame for his activities as long time coach of the women’s and men’s golf teams. He taught mathematics at Willamette University for 46 years, retiring in 2009.

As one of many activities after retirement, he offered his services as a volunteer to Keizer Community Library. His knowledge and skills in the field of technology were immediately put to use in connection with planned conversion to electronic inventory and circulation control and to providing opportunity for public Internet use.  He assumed the duties of Library Director in May 2011 and led the library’s expansion into larger quarters.

Prothero, who had for some time been battling terminal cancer, was forced to give up the position of  Library Director less than a year later.  He passed away on Friday, March 1.

Steve Prothero will be long remembered for his energy and enthusiasm as well as his final contribution of six new computers to the library.

Art Burr
Keizer

McNary grad party fund raising

To the Editor:

To the parents of the McNary High School graduating classes of 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and our community:

We need your help. The parents on the McNary Grad Party Committee would like to wrap up our fund raising efforts to provide a drug and alcohol-free graduation party for our seniors. We have been busy raising money all school year.

We are working with Egan Gardens again this year selling geraniums and gift cards. This fundraiser lines up with Mother’s Day and the planting of your own spring flower garden. We are collecting orders for individual geranium plants ($5), geranium hanging baskets ($28), or $20 Egan Gardens gift cards. There is a choice of colors and the price range suits any budget.

Many community members eagerly await this fundraiser. Flowers from Egan Gardens are very durable and can last all year long. Orders will be delivered on Saturday, May 4.

To place your order, please contact Melinda Parker ([email protected]) 503-990-6081 or Amy Donaldson ([email protected]) 503-393-7204.

Amy Donaldson
Keizer

Racism is not widespread

To the Editor:

I cannot recall being more surprised at a newspaper’s headline than I was in reaction to the Statesman Journal’s March 9 edition.  There, covering an entire half-page, was a photo of an African-American woman who works for Salem Hospital as its human resources manager, along with a caption in capital letters, “A MATTER OF HATE.”

Among my surprises regarding the article was that it went far beyond subtle, suggesting rather directly that Salem is a racist community where non-whites are not welcome.  Personal experience limits, it’s true, however, I worked for state of Oregon agencies for a total of 21 years and, while my fellow employees and those with whom I directly worked were of African-American, Asian-American, American-Samoan, American Indian origin, among respected and valued others, never did I hear one of them report that he or she found bullets on their desks and written invitations to leave the area …or else!

I am convinced that this sort of thing being thrown in the face of the community does no good at all and in fact probably sours race relations.  My thought on the matter: Get the facts in hand and determine the guilty person(s) before passing judgment on an entire community.

This piece in a local paper is viewed by this writer as amateurish and sensationalistic.  In no way does it represent the Statesman Journal’s finest journalistic hour.  Rather, opinion here finds, it shames it.

Gene H. McIntyre
Keizer

Everyone can make a difference

By BRAD COY

“Why can’t our elected leaders deliver on their promises to fix the problems facing our nation? If they can’t solve these problems, is there anything I can do that will make a difference?” As I have asked myself these questions, I have been inspired by the famous words spoken by President John F. Kennedy in his 1961 inaugural address, “Ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.”

I believe President Kennedy’s words tell us that the government does not have all the answers. Instead, we have a role to play and can help our country by becoming part of the solution. We all have unique talents and perspectives that are important ingredients in addressing our local needs. As each community becomes more self-sufficient, the burden we place on our government will decrease and everyone will benefit.

Rather than shifting our responsibilities up the chain of government, we should reinforce and support each other, starting on the neighborhood level. I believe the very act of relinquishing our problems to others is what makes them unfixable. Taking ourselves out of the equation is like multiplying by zero. The answer is always going to be zero. If anyone tells you they can fix your problems “without you doing a thing,” then either they are naive or bending the truth, and in the end we will pay the price if we remain as spectators. Instead, I believe we must do our part.

So, what can you do? One way to find out is by coming and getting involved in your local neighborhood association. As the president of the Gubser Neighborhood Association, my primary goal is to create a framework where we can share our talents and interests, develop friendships with our neighbors, build networks of mutual support, and be a united voice in letting everyone know that we want to be part of the solution that our country so desperately needs. The West Keizer Neighborhood Association is also actively working to support its residents. With your help, our neighborhood associations can become a resource for supporting our families, our neighborhoods, our schools, our city, and our nation.

But what if you don’t live within either association’s boundaries? Both associations welcome visitors or are willing to help other Keizer neighborhoods to form their own associations. In addition, the Gubser Neighborhood Association is considering expanding its boundaries to match Gubser Elementary School (which serves the adjacent Hidden Creek, Country Glen, Verda North, and Chemawa North neighborhoods), and we welcome your feedback on this decision at our meeting on March 21.

If you are interested in getting involved, please don’t hesitate to give me a call (503-967-5793), send me an email ([email protected]), join our online community (https://gubser.nextdoor.com), or come to our monthly meetings (third Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at Gubser Elementary School). You can also contact the West Keizer Neighborhood Association through their website (http://www.westkeizerna.org), on Facebook, or by attending their meetings (second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Keizer Civic Center).

With your involvement, we can be the change our country needs!

(Brad Coy is the president of the Gubser Neighborhood Association and lives with his wife and girls. He can be reached at [email protected] or (503) 967-5793.)