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Day: April 5, 2013

Eventful weekend lands woman in jail

 

L. King
L. King

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

A trio of incidents between a Keizer man and his Portland girlfriend culminated in her arrest last Sunday evening.

Latoyia Michelle King, 30, was arrested after pouring gasoline throughout 56-year-old boyfriend Robert Moore’s residence at 7802 St. Charles Street NE.

“We had quite the weekend with both of them,” said Capt. Jeff Kuhns with the Keizer Police Department.

King was arrested and charged with attempted arson, two counts of assault and criminal mischief. While being booked at Marion County Jail, a used methamphetamine pipe was found in King’s purse, leading to a criminal charge of unlawful possession of methamphetamine.

Kuhns said the arrest around 10:30 p.m. was the third incident between the couple in less than 24 hours.

The first incident happened around 3 a.m. last Sunday at the Shari’s Restaurant at the corner of River Road N and Chemawa Road NE.

“Moore called us and said they had an argument,” Kuhns said. “He said she threw a mailbox at his 2002 Mitsubishi Eclipse and damaged it. Then she ran off on foot. He didn’t press any charges.”


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 5 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

A banner night for market

KEIZERTIMES/File photo
KEIZERTIMES/File photo

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Sundays will soon be busy at the Keizer Civic Center.

In addition to the Lakepoint Community Church meeting at the city hall each Sunday at 11 a.m., for a three month span from June 2 to Sept. 1 a new Keizer Sunday Farmers Market will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Chalmers Jones Park, located behind city hall.

Keizer City Councilors on Monday approved plans for operations of the market, with a bulk of the discussion centered on parking and banners – the latter in particular drawing concerns.

There are approximately 275 parking spots at Keizer Civic Center, including spots by the adjacent Keizer Heritage Center. There are an additional 40 spots by the Carlson Skate Park.

Nate Brown, Keizer’s director of Community Development, said market parking will be limited to the 40 spots by the skate park and spots by the Heritage Center until 11:30 a.m., by which time everyone attending the Lakepoint service (around 200 people a week) would be there. At that point there would be no parking restrictions for the market.

“We met with the church that meets here and the market folks,” Brown said. “We’ve worked the details of how they will coordinate. They are both in favor of that.”

Councilor Cathy Clark is in favor of the market happening.

“I’m very excited about this,” Clark said. “It’s something we’ve wanted in the community.”


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 5 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Lady Celts go undefeated in C.O. tourney

 

The McNary High School varsity softball team gathers for a photo after its tournament win. (Submitted)
The McNary High School varsity softball team gathers for a photo after its tournament win. (Submitted)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

Things started out good and kept getting better for the McNary High School varsity softball team at Central Oregon Spring Break Tournament last week. The girls went undefeated to take the tournament title.

“Some of the non-conference games where we faced the really good pitchers helped us prepare for the tournament and that’s when it all came together,” said Kevin Wise, McNary head coach.

The Lady Celts played nearly flawless defense in their four-game run and pounded out 38 runs over the two-day tourney March 25 and 26.

“Our hits just kind of strung together for the most part and we worked as a team and played the best we could,” said sophomore Kianna Villareal.

McNary started the tournament with an 11-1 win over Crook County High School that saw senior Paige Bouska go 3 for 4 at the dish with a double.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 5 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Boys win two in Volcanoes tourney

 

McNary pitcher Ben Johnson connects with Hayden Gosling for an out at first in the game with Barlow High School Monday, April 1. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
McNary pitcher Ben Johnson connects with Hayden Gosling for an out at first in the game with Barlow High School Monday, April 1.
(KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School varsity baseball didn’t emerge from last week’s Volcanoes Spring Break Tournament unscathed, but when they were good, they were very, very good.

The Celtics went 2-2 for the four-day tournament. The team took wins over Woodburn and Summit high schools.

“Our defense was pretty good and our pitching staff did well, we just needed to put more runs on the board,” said Larry Keeker, McNary head coach.

The boys’ game with Willamette High School Wednesday, March 27, started well for the Celts with the team taking a 1-0 lead in the first, but a four-run fourth inning for Willamette put the team out of reach when the game was called due to time constraints. Chris Burger scored off a hit by Kaleb Simpson and Nick McDonald scored on a hit by Burger.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 5 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

A roundabout

No one who is elected or paid to work for the City of Keizer wakes in the morning thinking they’ll make life difficult for residents.

The reaction on social media to a news story about a traffic roundabout at Chemawa Road and Verda Lane was swift. Most people who posted didn’t see a need for it and thought it was silly to spend money on it while police positions go begging. Some cited safety concerns.

Some people have spoken—only a little too late. The roundabout—a final design has not yet been finalized—was part of the city’s Transportation System Plan (TSP) written in 2009. There were public hearings concerning the plan. Funds have been secured for construction which is expected to begin in 2014.

Those who say the money can be better spent on more immediate needs such as beefing up the Keizer Police Department, may not be aware of the funding process. State and federal money will be used for the project. City money from its Street Fund must be used exclusively for street projects; it is dedicated money that is not part of the city’s general budget.

One of the reasons cited for garnering grants from the feds and the state is that the roundabout is a modern, creative solution to a traffic problem.

The intersection of Chemawa Road and Verda Lane is busy, especially late afternoons. The choice of a roundabout rather than electronic traffic signals assures that most of the $1.2 million price tag will be borne by someone else. Keizer has always found a way get the most for the lowest cost to the city itself. It would be irresponsible for the city to spend upwards of a million dollars of its own money to install signals, a decidedly 20th century solution.

Research has shown that roundabouts lead to safer intersections. Will it be an adjustment for drivers? Certainly, but a roundabout will keep traffic flowing smoothly, which is important to Keizer residents.

In previous public meetings the city’s Public Works and Community Development Departments have found that residents want creative solutions to Keizer’s traffic. As the city continues to grow traffic, too, will increase. The roundabout is a low-cost solution to an issue that always ranks high in the concerns of our citizens.

The roundabout is a change from what Keizer has now. Traffic experts are confident this change will be beneficial for drivers. No one wants to make driving in Keizer more difficult, that’s why the roundabout is a good idea for our city’s future.

—LAZ

America’s most wanted… bug

By NICK THOMAS

Of all the animal species on the planet, which one kills the most people each year?

You might be thinking snakes. After all, cobras alone take out some 20,000 people annually in India. So, candidates with poison-laden fangs should logically be bumped to the top of the list, right? Nope.

How about wild carnivores sporting a prominent set of sharp teeth? Wrong again. You’re more likely to be savaged by a crazed Lady Gaga than by any shark, lion, or bear.

In fact, the answer may very well be sitting just a few feet away from you, right now, ready to strike.

More than a relentlessly annoying pest searching for its next meal, blood-sucking mosquitoes can kill their human victims by transmitting deadly diseases and parasites. These include malaria, yellow fever, and Dengue Fever which, collectively, kill millions of people around the world each year. Malaria alone will have bumped off ten poor souls by the time you finish reading this article.

While the mortality numbers are staggering enough, diseases spread by mosquitoes have also influenced human history. These winged micro-vampires reportedly may have contributed to the deaths of prominent figures including Jefferson Davis, Alexander the Great, and Oliver Cromwell.

It’s also been claimed that they helped thwart some of history’s great ancient armies by preventing the advancement of Roman legions, defeating the Spanish Armada, and spoiling an attempt to conquer the world by that lovable rogue, Genghis Khan.

Turns out that not all of the world’s 3,000 species of mosquitoes actually feast on humans. And rather than biting their victims, they actually stab their prey with a tiny, needle-like proboscis, sucking up as much as one and half times their body weight in blood.

During the “bite,” some of the insect’s saliva drains back into our blood.  Most people are slightly allergic to the saliva from these little droolers, which results in the familiar puffy, itchy welt that appears on the skin.  Only the females “bite,” and the blood provides protein for eggs.  Once topped up, they won’t eat again for several days. Bet you wish you could say the same thing about your fridge-raiding, teenage kids.

So what can you do to protect yourself from these flying hemoglobin addicts?  Well, you could build a canal around your home and fill it with Gambusia affinis, a small fish that can put away some 500 mosquito larvae a day.  However, if unreasonable city ordinances prohibit moat construction in your neighborhood, consider the following suggestions:

• Bathe regularly (hopefully, you do this anyway).  Lactic acid, produced by muscles during exercise, finds its way through the skin and attracts the menacing monsters in droves. So when partying under the stars, go easy on the dancing. Your cool moves may attract more than a dance partner.

• Be careful what you drink, because alcohol dilates blood vessels increasing blood flow near the skin. So, the more pickled you become, the more attractive you are as a meal.

• Finally, you might want to hold off that breathing because mosquitos have a liking for carbon dioxide, a component of our exhaled air.

So there you have it—simple steps to enjoy your next venture into the great outdoors. And I know they work, too. Because at the last BBQ party I attended, I spent the entire evening holding my breath, lying on the ground, motionless and sober.

Okay, so I wasn’t exactly the life of the party. But at least there were no skeeters on me when the hosts threw me out.

(Thomas’ features and columns have appeared in more than 300 magazines and newspapers. He can be reached at his blog: http://getnickt.blogspot.com.)

Cruelest month… for taxpayers

By DEBRA J. SAUNDERS

When you’re president, every day is a holiday. This April is National Financial Capability Month, as declared last week in a presidential proclamation. “I call upon all Americans to observe this month with programs and activities to improve their understanding of financial principles and practices,” quoth President Obama.

If April is the cruelest month, as T.S. Eliot wrote, then April as National Financial Capability Month could be the cruelest joke. It’s as if every day is April Fools’ Day, especially tax day, the dreaded 15th.

This also is the host month of this year’s Tax Freedom Day. Every year, the Washington-based Tax Foundation computes the trademarked day when “the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay off its total tax bill for the year.”

Tuesday, the Foundation will announce that Tax Freedom Day 2013 will fall on April 18. After that date, you’ll be working for your paycheck, not for the government.

What does “financial capability” mean in Washington? It’s an odd term that departs from the usual money lingo — like financial planning and financial literacy, two terms mentioned in the proclamation. There are some financial planning tips on the aptly named government website, Mymoney.gov.

While financial planning entails saving and investing, “financial capability” seems to be about — what else? — borrowing and spending. No wonder Obama wants to give the idea an ovation.

The proclamation promotes the administration’s College Scorecard and Financial Aid Shopping Sheet. Then it talks about more borrowing: “Financial capability also means helping people avoid scams and demand fair treatment when they take out a mortgage, use a credit card or apply for a student loan.”

Given the president’s record, the White House might want to rename April “Financial Audacity Month.” It goes with the president’s memoir, “The Audacity of Hope,” and his record of adding more than $4.trillion to the national debt while giving lip service to deficit reduction.

It’s rather bold for this White House to believe it is in a position to counsel anyone — except maybe Cyprus — on “how to budget responsibly,” as the proclamation promised.

As Tax Foundation chief economist Will McBride put it, Washington’s borrowing binge is fueled by two groups — “bootleggers and Baptists coming together to make really bad policy.”

The bootleggers, McBride explained, are “a bunch of people who are basically profligate and run up the deficit to spend money on their cronies. But then there’s a whole set of people who believe that it’s a good economic policy.” As an example of the Baptist variety, McBride named economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman.

On the spending side, the White House recommended “high-quality preschool and early education that gets every child on the right track early” as “ladders of opportunity” that lead to a solid middle-class life.

Financial capability then must be all about spending what you don’t have, putting more faith in education programs than they merit and heeding the sage advice of Washington politicians. It should start with this disclaimer: “Do as I say, not as I do.”

(Creators Syndicate)

City’s future is being planned

To the Editor:

Keizer is in the midst of planning the future direction of our city. There are a few more steps remaining and the public is encouraged to continue to  give their input. The city will be hosting an open house on April 10, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. regarding the Economic Opportunities Analysis/ Housing Needs Analysis. That will be followed by a public hearing of the Keizer Planning Commission on April 24. These meetings will invite the public to review the plans and tell us what they think. After careful consideration it may then be recommended to city council for possible approval. The public will again have a chance to get involved and make their voice heard. If it passes the council it will then be submitted to the state for final deliberation.

Although the city can make its plans there are some hurdles that still need to be crossed. It’s important to continue to support our city, realizing that public input is an essential component to the process in gauging where we are at and where we are going. Most of all we need to remember that Keizer is a well established city which is not going away, its future is bright with opportunities that have yet to present themselves. Whatever plans we have now should be seen as just a relatively small attempt of even better things to come.

We are always in the process of change, what that may look like we may not know, but something we can all agree with is that each of us has a share in being apart of the dream which makes Keizer what it is….and just as importantly….. what it will become. The potential of possibilities are endless.

Remember-—participate, share the dream, dare to imagine.

Matt Chappell
Keizer

Separate emotions from reality in the gun control debate

on-the-wild-side

On the Wild Side
by G.I. Wilson

Since I have been writing about the outdoors for years, I feel a need to write about some ramifications of the recent horrific shooting events. What do they have to do with the outdoors? Nothing. But, guns were involved. I write about hunting. Hunters use guns. As before, some will attempt to link these monstrous acts of violence–committed by madmen–with hunting.

Guns mean different things to different people. I belong to an outdoor writers association. We have members that have made a career of writing about guns, bullets and ballistics.

We have hunting writers that have traveled the globe covering hunting activities.

There are gun collectors that literally own hundreds of guns. Many of them are beautiful works of craftsmanship that will never be taken into the field. They are treasured and admired like other antiques and fine works of art and craftsmanship.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 5 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.