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Day: April 19, 2013

Keizerite recalls Boston blasts

 

Keizer’s Tina Karo-Grunberg (right) and friend Heather Rideout (left), seen after competing at an Oregon Wine Country 1/2 Marathon, were at the Boston Marathon on Monday. (Submitted)
Keizer’s Tina Karo-Grunberg (right) and friend Heather Rideout (left), seen after competing at an Oregon Wine Country 1/2 Marathon, were at the Boston Marathon on Monday. (Submitted)

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Tina Karo-Grunberg had been looking forward to competing in the Boston Marathon for the first time on Monday.

The 47-year-old runner from Keizer was still enjoying the day when she crossed the finish line in 3:51.19.

“I had tried to get in a year ago, but didn’t get accepted,” Karo-Grunberg said Tuesday. “I got accepted this time. It was real exciting until the big event happened. There are not a lot of words. It took the wind out of the sails for a lot of people.”

Karo-Grunberg, a nurse at Salem Hospital, was heading back toward the finish area to pick up her medal when two bombs exploded. As of Wednesday afternoon, there were three confirmed deaths and more than 170 people injured.

“I had gotten my medal and went through a couple of streets to gather my gear,” said Karo-Grunberg, who noted other Oregon runners with her were likewise uninjured. “While waiting for my gear is when I heard the explosions. I saw the plumes of smoke. People were panicked and crying, wanting to call people. We didn’t know really what was happening.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 19 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Equestrian team going for gold this weekend

Alyssa Lorimor, Leah Burleson, Mikayla Paschall and Claire Zielinski will compete in the Willamette District meet at the Oregon State Fairgrounds this weekend. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Alyssa Lorimor, Leah Burleson, Mikayla Paschall and Claire Zielinski will compete in the Willamette District meet at the Oregon State Fairgrounds this weekend. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School equestrian team is heading to the district competition this weekend at the Oregon State Fairgrounds and hoping to make enough of a show to qualify for the state competition in May.

“We’re all excited for team penning and getting a few cows into the pen. We’re also excited about the in-hand obstacle relay, it’s a trail course where we’re on foot and the horse’s rein is in our hands and we’re leading them over bridges and poles,” said rider Alyssa Lorimor. Lorimor’s horse is named Misty.

In team penning, the four riders and their horses work as a group to corral calves.

The Oregon High School Equestrian Team Willamette District Meet will test the team’s skills in a variety of areas Friday, April 19, through Sunday, April 21.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 19 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

‘Calm ferocity’ pays off for Lady Celts

Paige Bouska connects with Kinsey McNaught for an out at second during the Celts’ game with McKay High School. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Paige Bouska connects with Kinsey McNaught for an out at second during the Celts’ game with McKay High School. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

When a game goes bad, it’s easy for players to lose their cool, but that hasn’t been the case for the McNary High School varsity softball team.

As an example, McNary’s Kinsey McNaught offers up last week’s contest with Sprague High School, April 10, and the reaction on the field to the Olys’ three-run homer in the third inning.

“You couldn’t see (the effect) on any of our faces,” McNaught said. “We’re really good at keeping our composure.”

Celt Dani Saunders said the incident was indicative of the team’s “calm ferocity.”

“We don’t get too excited or overwhelmed,” Saunders said.

McNary engaged in a see-saw battle with Sprague that had the teams tied 8-8 in the eighth inning when Celt Jordyn Hanson hit a double driving in McNaught for the game-winning run.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 19 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Girls tennis stays UNDEFEATED

Celt Allison McGregor returns a volley in competition Thursday, April 11. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Celt Allison McGregor returns a volley in competition Thursday, April 11. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

It’s been rare in recent years for the words undefeated and McNary High School tennis to appear in the same sentence, but as the Lady Celts headed into a match with Sprague High School Tuesday, April 16, that was precisely the situation.

“It’s been good for them because we’ve had to focus on maintaining a certain level of play every time out. It’s also been a learning experience because they’ve had to get used to the notion that they are expected to win. They have to keep improving themselves,” said Mark Kohley, McNary head coach.

An 8-0 rout of McKay High School last week was a prime example of just how the team has flourished.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 19 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Earth Day, 2013

Earth Day is celebrated around the world each year on April 22; 2013 marks the 43rd anniversary of the first Earth Day.

The United States has progressed a long way since 1970; Oregon has one of the highest rates of recycling in the country. Today our society talks about recycling, reducing waste, and sustainable lifestyles.  To some Earth Day may be just a holdover from the 1970s, but it is not. We have one planet we all have to share and we face new challenges those in the 1970s never considered.

People can debate climate change with the best of intentions, some say it is man-made, others say it is a natural cycle of the earth (Ice Age, anyone?). Some deplore the fate of polar bears in the Artic due to a melting ice cap. Scientists say that ice in Antartica is melting at its fastest rate ever.

Does it matter to people in Keizer that ice caps are melting? Does it matter that a pipeline break spills diluted bitumen in Arkansas? Anything that harms the environment should be of concern to every global citizen. A concern for the environment should not mean we call for draconian regulations and restrictions. There are more than 7 billion people living on the planet, every one using energy and producing waste of some kind.

On a local level we endeavor to reduce, reuse and recycle. We dutifully put our blue and red recycling bins on the curb, and we feel good that we are doing our part. Is there more we can do?  Yes.

Marion County Public Works will sponsor an Earth Day event at Oregon Garden on Saturday, April 20. There will be demonstrations, seminars and information from more than 20 businesses. It will be celebration of Earth Day but there will also be food and music.

Living green has been popular for the past decade. Consumer products are marketed as being environmentally friendly. Reducing energy use via LEED certified construction and installation of solar panels are growing. Those are the big ‘gets’ of living green. Celebrations such as the one at Oregon Garden should not forget the small, simple things every household can do. A national dry cleaners association is calling for its customers to recycle the wire hangers—millions and millions find their way into landfields. (The best way to recycle wire hangers is to return them to the cleaners.) There are plenty of simple steps a household can take to be green and environmentally sensitve. Some shoppers find it hard to give up their plastic bags; those plastic bags have many household uses, but how many are needed? A reusable cloth shopping bag is a great idea and if more people voluntarily reduced the use of plastic bags, there would be millions fewer that end up in landfields.

There will be many ideas at Marion County’s Earth Day event on Saturday. As with most things, it begins with teaching our children the sanctity of the earth and our environment. Forest Ridge Elementary School and its principal Gary Etchemendy in Keizer is at the forefront of teaching sustainability. Its students and teachers are leaders in environmental education.

As the world celebrates Earth Day 2013 we all should take a look at our lifestyles and see how we can be part of a solution. We in Keizer may not be able to solve the problem of climate change, but we can think globally and act locally when it comes to preserving the only home we have.

—LAZ

What’s that about respect?

To the Editor:

Was anyone else struck by the irony of the headline on a letter last week? (Keizertimes, April 12)  “Respect everyone” was the headline; however the letter was anything but respectful.  Respecting someone requires listening and understanding. Webster’s defines respect as “an act of giving particular attention: consideration” or” high or special regard; esteem” This was not demonstrated in Mr. Gene McIntyre’s letter.

Mr. McIntyre states, “Not having interviewed the candidate I can only guess at her motivation.”  He then proceeds to imagine her motivations behind Mrs. Strawn’s clearly stated concern over Planned Parenthood’s activities in two Salem-Keizer High Schools.  His descriptions of her imaginary motivations were filled with disdain and offensive slurs.

Planned Parenthood is the nation’s largest abortion provider.  They rake in millions of dollars doing abortions—something more than half of Americans think is wrong.  She is right to be concerned about the influence of this giant corporation on our school kids.  I believe that just as it would be inappropriate to welcome a cigarette company or a soda distributor to teach a unit in health class, it is inappropriate for the district to permit Planned Parenthood to do so.

A concerned citizen who cares about this issue among others has put her name on the ballot, stepped forward to run and if elected serve on the school board.  In my book—agree or disagree—that deserves respect.

Lois Anderson
Keizer

Marathon bombing hits home

By SUSAN ESTRICH

I’m from Boston. Over the years, I lived in two apartments within a stone’s throw of Monday’s bombings. Over the years, I stood and cheered marathon runners countless times. I know every square inch of the area in all the pictures, which is hardly unusual. It’s the center of Boston. My nephew was around the corner when the explosions went off.

This week’s terror hit home for me.

And what to do? That is always the question.

Do you stop going to sporting events? Cultural events? Outdoor rallies?

I was raped around the corner from where the bombs hit. I did not stop going out, didn’t quit my job working nights as a bartender. (I was raped during the day, anyway.) I was determined not to let the crazies run my life. I was younger then.

An even harder question: What do we want the government to do?

How much of our liberty and privacy are we willing to give up in the hopes that it might stop terror?

My answer to that now is also different from what it would have been in the days when I lived around the corner from the bombings. Maybe it’s because I’m older. Maybe it’s because I’m a mother. Or maybe, probably mostly, it’s because of the horrors we have seen. The two planes that crashed into the World Trade Center on 9/11 took off that morning from Boston (my old home) en route to Los Angeles (my current home). Until my children were born, I commuted on those flights from Boston to LA.

So this is my answer: I’d give up a lot. You want to put cameras on every corner? Fine with me. I don’t care who pats me down at the airport. Pat away. Keep the confidences of my clients, but otherwise, my email is an open book. Mine my data; listen to my conversations. If it will keep my children safe, I don’t care.

But of course, that’s not the question, either. I’m a middle-aged, well-dressed (mostly), respectable-looking white woman. No one is really interested in me, terrorism-wise.

So when I ask myself or my students how much liberty we’re willing to give up, I’m not really asking about us. I’m asking about “others” —and we all know which others I mean. As I write this, Monday night, I would not want to be a Muslim going through security at Logan Airport. Just for instance. And I don’t blame the TSA if they pay more careful attention. I just want the planes to take off and land.

I ask my students: If there are two security lines at the airport, and one has three white businessmen about to whisk off their jackets, and the other has three Muslim men, which line do you join? I know what I would do. Is that racist? Are we?

As I write this, we don’t know who planted the bombs that tore off limbs, took innocent lives, disrupted a race that celebrates “Patriots Day” every year, a race where this year the 26th mile was dedicated to the 26 who died in Newtown. But the media are reporting that a Saudi student was being questioned after the bombings because of his proximity, the nature of his injuries and, yes, his nationality. Racist?

How do you avoid being a racist when you’re afraid?

How do you avoid offering up your privacy and liberty—or, more likely, someone else’s—when you are terrified of terror?

How do you maintain a free society when you see limbs flying?

It’s true these events are rare. It’s true that, compared to other countries, we are indeed remarkably free and safe. And perhaps we also are spoiled to believe that in this day and age we can have it all: freedom and safety, privacy and security, not to mention equality.

When I was a kid, we worried about the Russians. We practiced going to the basement of the school in case of a nuclear attack. How odd to see those as less terrifying days—and to long for them.

I hope the Saudi man had nothing to do with it. I hope the culprits, when they are found, will not add to our collective terror of “others.” I hope this will not be a case that makes us even more afraid of those who are different from us, even though 99.9 percent of them mean us no harm. I hope.

(Creators Syndicate)

TV show set in the ‘60s but far beyond

By GENE H. McINTYRE

My eye teeth were cut on TV dramas in the early 1960s.  Most memorable to me—as a young whippersnapper back in those days—were 77 Sunset Strip, Route 66, and The Naked City.  They presented Hollywood versions of life among the in-crowd in Southern California, on-the-road along U.S 66 (all the way to my hometown of Astoria, Oregon in one episode) and detective work in “a city of 8 million people.”

The formula for each episode was so scripted it meant that the viewer could absolutely predict that the heroes in each installment would come out unscathed, live to see another episode, and gain evermore fame and fortune for their television work.  Whatever the case, it was nothing more in each presentation than a fantasy trip and one that captured popular attention back in those yesteryears.

Now, then, there has been many a weekly fantasy trip to keep the spirit up through the drudgery of life at the typical 40-hour job.  They have usually “hooked” many among us, being entertaining enough to keep us coming back again and again until, as they all have done so, sooner or later, becoming deposits in the TV archives.  Of late, the BBC have contributed Downton Abbey and Top of the Lake, to name but two among an ever-expanding set of serialized sequentials.

Considering a currently all-the-rave show, Mad Men, what’s most interesting about it is that it has broken with tradition in its opening two episodes of its sixth season.  Formerly, it was more like a fictional docudrama look at America’s 1960s past in the business of ad-making.  It has always offered up characters who interact by talking past each other, connect lamely, if at all, speak cryptically, and leave viewers to guess what’s next with and among them.

Season six presented a two-hour show two weeks ago and it was soon apparent that six would not be in the same genre as the first five seasons.  Sex was somewhat incidental in the first five but now has taken over the whole show and, if your taste runs with voyeur experiences, it will surely satisfy a need.

At the same time, it may be that the huge change suggests Mad Men has taken a giant leap from the 1960s to 2013, and wants to address mental health issues.  How so?  Well Don Draper (Jon Hamm) has been displaying mental health issues from the first episode of season six when he couldn’t seem to evidence anything other than to mope around and brood while visiting Hawaii with nothing less than one of the most gorgeous women (Jessica Paré) in America.

Philandering would appear to be a common pastime with many an American man and woman these days; those who cannot find it in themselves to practice oneness with the person they chose to marry.  Draper is one of those for sure but he comes across as unhappy about it while continuing his wayward behavior.  Stay tuned or not, it may, as one critic commented, “challenge and annoy,” episode to episode, but is unlikely to bore.

(Gene H. McIntyre lives in Keizer.)