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Day: August 2, 2013

Mural, mural on the wall

 

Jill Hagen (left) and Jody Farley (right) with Keizer Arts Association are looking for artists to do a three-section mural to go on the wall at Keizer Florist, owned by Julie Wallace (center). (KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy)
Jill Hagen (left) and Jody Farley (right) with Keizer Arts Association are looking for artists to do a three-section mural to go on the wall at Keizer Florist, owned by Julie Wallace (center). (KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy)

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

By this time next year, there should be a rather large piece of art hanging in Keizer.

If all goes according to plan, a large mural – the city’s first – will be unveiled next Aug. 1 on the west side of Keizer Florist, located at 631 Chemawa Road NE. That day is the second anniversary of Julie Wallace owning the business.

The Keizer Art Association (KAA) is sponsoring the mural and is sending out a call to artists. Jill Hagen and Jody Farley brought the idea to the KAA board earlier this year.

“We want to see how the process goes,” Hagen said. “We want to see what kind of support there is. We’re hoping the community will be supportive of this. I like fun projects. This is a really nice thing to do for the community.”


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the August 2 print edition of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe to the print edition for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

A step back in time

Bob Beachboard (left) and American Classic Barbershop owner Dave Box (right) are helping Wounded Warrior Project. (KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy)
Bob Beachboard (left) and American Classic Barbershop owner Dave Box (right) are helping Wounded Warrior Project. (KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy)

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

There is plenty old at American Classic Barbershop.

A couple of things that aren’t old at the business, located at 4196 River Road N: the age of the business itself (opened March 2011) and the fundraiser taking place Saturday, Aug. 3.

From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday shop owner Dave Box and co-worker Bob Beachboard will be providing buzz cuts on a donation basis. All proceeds will go to the Wounded Warrior Project, which helps soldiers hurt in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“It kind of snowballed,” said Box, a former deputy sheriff and state investigator. “We have a lot of veterans who come in here, some disabled in the Middle East. Just in talking to those guys and listening to their stories, I found out about Wounded Warrior. It’s a great charity.”


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the August 2 print edition of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe to the print edition for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Volcanoes halt losing skid with squeeker

Volcanoes pitcher Chase Johnson gets an out for Salem-Keizer at First base in the team’s game with the Dust Devils Saturday, July 27. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Volcanoes pitcher Chase Johnson gets an out for Salem-Keizer at First base in the team’s game with the Dust Devils Saturday, July 27. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By HERB SWETT
For the Keizertimes

A losing streak was snapped Monday as the Volcanoes edged the visiting Tri-City Dust Devils 3-2 at home.

Each club had a home run with one man on base in the second inning, but Salem-Keizer added a run in the sixth.

Starting pitcher Pat Young, who had been with the Volcanoes only about a week, retired the visitors in order in the first inning. So did the Dust Devils’ starter, Ryan Warner.

In the top of the second, a two-out error by shortstop Brandon Bednar put Tri-City’s Alec Meherten on first base. Julian Yan then hit the ball over the right field wall.

The Volcanoes lost no time in responding. Tyler Horan singled to left, and Ryan Tuntland hit his first homer in a Volcano uniform over the left field fence.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the August 2 print edition of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe to the print edition for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

Rocky week for Salem-Keizer at home

A Tri-City runner slides into home plate behind catcher Ty Ross in the game Saturday, July 27. The Volcanoes lost the contest 5-4. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
A Tri-City runner slides into home plate behind catcher Ty Ross in the game Saturday, July 27. The Volcanoes lost the contest 5-4. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By HERB SWETT
For the Keizertimes

July 23:
Hillsboro 9, 
Volcanoes 6

The home series with the Hops started with their first win over Salem-Keizer.

A one-run bottom of the first inning gave the Volcanoes their only lead of the game. Tyler Hollick singled, reached second base on an error and third on a grounder, and scored on a single by Jeremy Sy.

Hillsboro’s biggest inning was the third, when four runs scored on three singles, a walk and an error. The Hops scored three times in the sixth on two doubles, a single, a walk and an error.

In the Volcano fourth, Sam Eberle walked, Ty Ross doubled, and Eberle scored on a ground out. An error that put Brandon Bednar on first base allowed Ross to score. Bednar stole second base and scored on a single by Sy.

Joe Kurrasch was the losing pitcher with a 2-4 record. Austin Platt was the winning pitcher in relief.

July 24:
Volcanoes 4, 
Hillsboro 1

Improved pitching and fielding stopped a five-game losing streak.

The Volcanoes broke a scoreless tie with a run in the sixth inning. After the Hops tied the score in the seventh, Salem-Keizer responded with two runs in the seventh and one in the eighth.

In the Volcano seventh, Geno Escalante hit an infield single, and Ty Ross moved him to second with a sacrifice bunt, reaching first on an error. A sacrifice bunt by Ryan Jones moved both runners up. Brian Ragira singled Escalante and Ross home.

Jake Shadle was the winning pitcher in relief, running his record to 2-0. Raymundo Montero got his seventh save. Patrick Smith was the losing pitcher in relief.


To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the August 2 print edition of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe to the print edition for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in Keizer.

OSAA athletes: Low-cost, free physicals offered next week

OSAA-logo-480x270

Middle and high school students in need of physical exams before taking part in OSAA-sanctioned sports this fall can receive low-cost or free exams courtesy of Willamette Health Partners next week.

On Tuesday, Aug. 6, exams will be given between 9 a.m. and noon for $10 at South Salem High School, 1910 Church Street S.E., in Salem. Space is limited to 90 students. Pre-register by calling Community Health Education Center at 503-814-2432.

Thursday, Aug. 8, $10 exams will be administered at West Salem High School, 1776 Titan Drive N.W., in Salem. Space is limited to 40 students, call 503-814-2432 to pre-register.

Free exams will be administered between 8:45 and 10:45 a.m. at Willamette Surgery Center. No pre-registration is required.

Students must bring a completed OSAA participation form and be accompanied by a parent or guardian to receive a physical.

Education at Keizer Rapids

If supporters prevail the former caretakers house at Keizer Rapids Park would be converted into an education center. The house is located on the bluff overlooking the park’s amphitheatre.

Some say the house should be razed and a new structure constructed; others say the existing building can be remodeled.

Adding education to the region’s crown jewel park is a good idea but some are putting the cart way in front of the horse. Certainly there is money that foundations would grant to turn the house into a center of learning about the park’s environs and nature in general. But then what?

What would be in the education center?  Photos?  Kiosks? Informational signs? If that’s it, it seems like an pretty expensive drop-by classroom. We can only assume that those who are pushing for an education center have already been in contact with Salem-Keizer Schools (which of course does not have the money to staff even a part-time host for an education center).

Who would the city put in charge of leading the development of the center?  We can only assume it would be someone with an educational and horticultural background.

A few hundred thousand dollars is a lot of money for a project that has a “Let’s build it!” feel to it without much thought about what happens after such a center is completed.

An education element to the park is a good thing but the city should be smart about how to use the former caretaker’s house. It’s a sizable building; use it as a education center combined with a dressing room (for performers at the Keizer Rotary Amphitheatre) and even for food/beverage concessions.

Supporters want to use Park System Development Charge money for the project. Applying for grants from organizations that are eager to give money for projects with an educational element, there should be enough money to make that building a showcase for everyone to use. And that’s what parks are for, the benefit of the entire community.

—LAZ

Parking at Keizer Rapids dog park

To the Editor:

Like many other Keizerites we have found a wonderful place to spend time together as a family while playing with our beloved pooch, Maggie, at the Keizer Rapids Dog Park. We have, however, noticed that parking is becoming an issue when summer concerts or plays are being held. The park does have a sign that states Parking for Dog Park Visitors Only. However, it is very small and hidden on the bottom half of a kiosk pretty much unnoticeable to most guests.  I brought this to the attention of the parks department last summer suggesting that perhaps the sign could be placed in a more visible location.

Alas, summer concerts are back (yea!) and the park is once again full of people enjoying the fresh air, friends, music and entertainment. The parks department has stated that the grassy area to the south of the dog park is where concert attendees should in fact be parking. The paved area is provided for dogs and their guests who frequent the dog park. We took our kids and dog to the park last night, Friday, July 26th and were disappointed to find all of the parking spaces full with only a handful of dogs at the park. Once again, the concert/play guests parked in an area specifically designated for dog park guests only. Since the city has not moved the sign to a better location where it’s clearly visible to all, I would ask that those attending the summer events please be respectful and park in the grassy area provided and allow the pets and their guests to park on the pavement outside of the dog park.

Your help and support would be greatly appreciated!

Dona Jones
Keizer

Ulali Drive and Lockhaven

To the Editor:

I think it would be a good idea to look at the stop light situation where Ulali Drive connects to Lockhaven Drive.  Specifically if you are entering Lockhaven to travel east.

No turn is permitted on red, which causes terrible lines of traffic to form.  There is really no reason right turn should not be permitted here on a red light.

Also, if you are entering Lockhaven to go west, you can turn right on a red even though you are directly crossing a railroad track.  If the train is coming, the sign that says “No turn on red” is lit, but I personally have been caught here when I did a right turn and then the light came on and I was almost hit by the falling railroad bar.  I think coming out of the station from the north should be barred from right turn on red and coming out from the south (heading east on Lockhaven) should allow right turn on red.

If you go there on a Friday afternoon (many other times for sure) you will see a huge line of cars backed up to get onto eastbound Lockhaven Drive.  Often they are backed up to the underpass.

Teresa Jones
Keizer

The ease and pitfalls of online buying

By DON VOWELL

Now I’m starting to worry about my privacy.  It is not simply the revelations from Edward Snowden about our government keeping records of all my phone calls that woke me up.  It was Amazon.

The agitator in our washing machine stopped agitating.  The bottom half worked as normal, but the top half barely wiggled.  A short online search, still amazing to me, showed that I needed a new set of “dogs”/pawls to restore its health.  The pawls cost $2.69 postage included and the problem is fixed.

The new problem is the inundation of helpful suggestions from Amazon about other stuff I might be interested in.  They hoped that I might like to buy a new agitator as well, or possibly replace some appliances.  This is nothing new to me.  Having bought some camera gear from Amazon last year, I am sent their electronics department sales notices several times a month.  That’s fine.  I look through them and dream.

There was one near disaster.  I looked at a four-place kayak trailer, and went all the way to the “checkout” step in order to find out a possible shipping cost.  Then I stopped and went on my way.   The next time my wife ordered a small item online the price was $1,650 more than she expected.   They still hoped to send me the kayak trailer.

Like most people with ordinary lives, I haven’t worried much about the increasing level of government and corporate snooping.  If I have no secrets, there’s little for them to discover.

It was in truth a story in The Oregonian that woke me up.  An invasion of privacy is not always benign.  A Portland man hosted a website that published the names of STD carriers.  Those names were submitted by anyone, without verification.  If you didn’t have an STD, but found your name on there, your only course for getting it removed was to submit medical records and/or pay a fee of $1,000.  This guy is now serving two years in prison because he threatened a woman who turned some of his same tactics on him to get her name removed.

In my dealings with Amazon, Expedia, and many other smaller online businesses, I have blithely handed them access to my bank account, via my debit card number.  I don’t know what makes me think that’s perfectly safe.  The Internet has made it frightfully easy for you and I to slide toward having no secrets at all.

If only North Korea polls lower than the U.S. Congress for integrity or popularity, there is little reason to trust them with controlling the ever growing masses of data about our personal lives.  I saw an article recently speculating about the possibility that all of your credit transactions, online purchases, and even retail bank card swipes could be monitored.  I’m not sure about the national security value of all that, but I am sure that Congress can’t be trusted to question it, and their denial wouldn’t carry much weight.  Since our new reality is a constipated Congress that cannot produce anything unrelated to corporate profit, this is another question that will take quite a public uproar if there is to be any change, or even discussion.

I am not required to admire Edward Snowden, and he is not required to stand up and take his lumps just to suit me.  I am still glad that he has brought this subject up.  I also hope that Amazon’s observation of me doesn’t extend to reading this page.  I’m liable to find a kayak trailer kit on my porch as retaliation.

(Don Vowell lives in Keizer.)

U.S. needs to graduate more scientists

Bloomberg View columnist, Cass R. Sunstein, recently commented on the concern by many Americans that we have a low number of science major graduates from the nation’s colleges and universities.  Graduates in science and engineering in the U.S. have been considerably lower than those in China and Japan while math and science testing has U.S. students below those of students in Australia, England, Finland, Israel, Russia, Singapore and South Korea.

You may already know that science majors can contribute to economic growth while many of them end-up with secure, high-paying jobs after graduation.  Nevertheless, some say we now have a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) crisis here.

President Obama has lamented that, “Growing industries in science and technology have twice as many openings as we have workers who can do the job.  Think about that: Openings at a time when millions of Americans, especially among our youth, are looking for work.”

Many among us ask, “Why is this?  Are young Americans not interested in science?”

It’s has been determined through data gathering  that at the time of college entrance, students view science as an appealing major.  A study by Dr. Bruce Stinebrickner of DePauw University found that while entering students (at the rate of nearly 20 percent) believe they will study science, only slightly over seven percent follow through by majoring in it.  So, many who enroll with a science major intent demonstrate a high propensity to later leave that field of study.

Is there something wrong with college science teachers?  Are students enrolled in science courses bored in their course work?  What has gone amiss?

Well, as the world in college turns, a considerable number of enrollees turn out to be unrealistically optimistic about their performance ability.  Also, receiving low grades in the courses discourages a commitment to stick them through four or five years of possibility to fail to complete to a degree award.

When these students who change their major or drop out entirely are interviewed, it turns out that they were not adequately prepared for college level science course work.  Hence, lack of adequate high school preparation is blamed.

However, it is the view of this writer that there is much more to this matter than the mere laying of blame on our high schools.  Also in the mix of what’s not right by college freshman who entered the hallowed halls of ivy with science in mind but soon departed that interest, is the responsibility of parents to start their offspring thinking a lot and often about the seriousness of putting a great deal of time and effort into their high school classes as well as providing them with a place at home to study that doesn’t include constant distractions, like TV and video games.

Then, too, there are the social dimensions of the American culture which must be challenged.  Sports participation is good as is involvement in music, vocal or instrument, as a balance with academic pursuits.  However, the social side is viewed as a huge imbalance for teens in high school which takes them away from their studies, setting the stage for inordinate time spent in non-academic-related pursuits.

Do you, as a parent, value a college education and recognize the advantages of a degree in some science field?  If so, it means communicating that view to your child from ‘day one’ or as soon as reasonably possible after birth.  Then there’s working with your child’s elementary and high school teachers and administrators, volunteering in your child’s school whenever possible, and asking about, helping and keeping up with homework assignments.

Meanwhile, although economic times are hard and very tough for many, parents are advised to set aside money every month from their child’s birth as a family trust fund, enabling your child to set his or her realistic sights on going to college.   For their child’s part, achieving good grades, being an active community member, and participating in school functions will mean a very good chance of securing scholarships and other academic awards to help defray the initial high costs while keeping after-graduation debt as low as possible.

There is the other side of the proverbial coin: the need for jobs for all unemployed Americans and jobs after college graduation. Another major issue is the way Oregon’s governor is influencing the spending our tax dollars that could otherwise go for real education reforms: No one need look further than the Rudy Crew example to view caution-less spending of precious taxpayer dollars.

Then there are the corporations that our state and national leadership are allowing to take over public education for profit, the totally outrageous salaries of professional athletes and celebrity types while our teacher ranks are cut.

With considerable help from the Bush (43) and Obama administrations, they have nosed their way into the preparation and distribution of national exams from which they are realizing huge profits and seek further inroads.  Teachers in public school are forced often nowadays to teach to the test rather than help youth learn to think and problem-solve  Thereby, teachers are too frequently test monitors rather than teachers.

Only those among us who are organized in great numbers can change what’s going on.  Caring parents throughout the world recognize that strong, sustained family support and encouragement in concert with schools dedicated to a positive learning environment are two of the most important factors that make for youth success.  Oregon should be no exception.

(Gene H. McIntyre lives in Keizer.)