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Month: March 2014

Can the US head off a new Cold War?

Students of history might argue successfully that the Cold War between the former Soviet Union and the United States actually got underway when the U.S. dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  The success of those two detonations resulted in a case of extreme paranoia on Joseph Stalin’s part and began the protracted competition involving the two surviving major world powers.

A mere child when the Cold War started, there are a few snippets of it that remain fixed in my memory.  There were the “duck and cover” drills in school that were purely show-time as an atomic bomb in close proximity means vaporization of human bodies, no matter how large the desk, while further away simply means a slower death by radiation poisoning.  My parents and their friends spoke in whispers about our fate, wondering if the current year’s Christmas would be the last one for us.  The Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962 resulted in a 13-day migraine headache for me.

Whatever the case, the former Soviet Union conducted its first weapons test of a nuclear device on Aug. 29, 1949.  Thereafter, although it was officially called the Cold War, it got people in the U.S. sweaty-hot, producing a daily nightmare until President Ronald Ragean and Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev held several summit conferences in the late 1980s which contributed to the end of the Cold War and the ultimate dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991.

During the ensuing years there were some things scary and others humorous.  The World War III theme was common in American movies where the villains sported Russian accents.  Then, too, who could forget the 1964 British-American black comedy, Dr. Strangelove, which satirized the nuclear scare.  Meanwhile, the color red, bears, sickles, hammers, big coats and furry hats were culturally banned here.

After Reagan and Gorbachev shook hands many Americans were able to breathe deeply for the first time in years.  The “strategic defense initiative” or “Star Wars” was a fiction of the U.S. government to throw the Russians into apoplexy over the cost of the technology to compete and they backed down with the U.S. standing alone as the only superpower.

Thereby, World War III became only a Hollywood fixation.  But, just wait one minute here! That was until the Winter Games finished in Sochi and Russia’s re-elected President Vladimir Putin decided it was time to throw his gauntlet down in what appears to be a rather direct effort to reclaim the lands and people of the former Soviet Union. He already made some moves against the independent nation of Georgia. Now, it’s the Ukraine’s Crimea that Putin has placed under Russia’s control.

The U.S. has warned Russia about its interference in Ukraine, a highly provocative action whose follow-up to taking Crimea could be the precursor to an invasion of Ukraine itself.   The U.S. has imposed some sanctions as has Russia on us.  President Obama stated last week that the U.S. will not proceed with military interventions but that position could change should Putin send the Russian army into Ukraine.

Meanwhile, the beat goes on as officials in Ukraine have made statements such as, “Does Russia not understand that this is the beginning of World War III?.”  And Russian state television has remarked that “Russia is the only country in the world that is realistically capable of turning the United States into radioactive ash.”   Behind the Russian TV guy was a green-screen backdrop of a nuclear mushroom cloud from which it’s credibly imagined that whenever Putin hears a reference to “the West,” he starts fingering a Molotov Cocktail and it is 1950s deja vu all over again.

Truly, it’s hoped that cooler heads will prevail as it requires hardly any imagination at all to realize that a World War III scenario would end up rather badly for everyone in Russia, the U.S., and the whole world.  Maybe this is just big talk and headline-making bluster.  In the meantime, it’s popularly speculated that Putin wants to establish the Russian empire much more than he seeks the opportunity to make money in the world’s marketplaces or help to establish “one world.”  As for me, there may soon be a second-in-a-lifetime migraine, but it could be the least of my worries.

(Gene H. McIntyre lives in Keizer.)

Getting the head in gear

Gearhead-Automotive-logo-960px

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

For Jun Zhu, the reason for opening Gearhead Automotive earlier this year was simple.

“We don’t have enough affordable auto repair shops in Keizer,” said Zhu, who opened his shop at 1091 Chemawa Road North No. 11 in January. “I’m also trying to see if I can help the community. I want to help them out.”

For Zhu, he sees that working in two ways, one involving his senior mechanic Richard Gonzales Jr.

“McNary High School is teaching auto repair,” Zhu said. “I want to see if we can send our senior mechanic there to help, or have some of those students come to my shop. And for little league, I’m hoping to be able to sponsor them. I want to get our name out as a sponsor.”

Zhu talked with mechanic James Rockwell last fall and decided to open the shop. The two looked at nearly 60 spaces before settling on their Chemawa Road location. Rockwell recently left due to National Guard commitments, leaving Gonzales as the sole mechanic.

“Right now it’s just Richard,” Zhu said. “Once we get more traffic, I want to get a second person. He’s been trained as a GM certified mechanic. He’s also been fixing foreign cars like BMWs. I go down there every other day. Richard is dealing with the day-to-day. I’m not a mechanic, so I can’t fix cars.”

Gonzales Jr. has eight years of experience working on General Motors products, plus four years working on Audis, BMWs and Minis.

“I’m a great tech,” said Gonzales, 29. “I’ve always been at shops for at least five years. You’ve got to find someone willing to take changes. I come from Southern California. My buddies started their own shop. I started as a helper, next thing you know I’m knocking down motors. We did all makes and models. I put my hands on a lot of fast cars.”

Gonzales got to know Rockwell by ordering parts at O’Reilly Auto Parts and was intrigued by the idea of working at the new shop.

“As long as we keep the customer flow going, it should be good,” Gonzales said. “When I saw the building, I said they are for real. This is the real deal.”

Zhu is optimistic business will start picking up.

“This is brand new here,” he said. “It’s starting a little bit slow. We’re trying to get our name exposed more. We’re here to help and have reasonable rates. I think we are needed in town, it’s just a matter of time.”

The shop labor rate is $82.50 an hour, while police, fire and military members get a 15 percent discount. The shop phone number is 971-202-2299.

“Pure Grit” by Mary Cronk Farrell, foreword by First lieutenant Diane Carlson Evans

Pure-Grit

 

“Pure Grit” by Mary Cronk Farrell, foreword by First lieutenant Diane Carlson Evans

c.2014, Abrams Books for Young Readers
$24.95 / $27.95 Canada
160 pages

 

BOOK REVIEW
by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER

When it comes to chores around the house, you have lots of responsibility.

You’re in charge of mealtime twice a week. You take out the trash, clean your room, finish your schoolwork, and you even babysit sometimes.

That’s a lot but you can handle it because you know you’ll have different responsibilities as you get older. And in the new book “Pure Grit” by Mary Cronk Farrell, you’ll see that some could be bigger than others.

By the late 1930s, at end of the Depression, Americans “had no interest in fighting a war of any kind…” Still, military leaders were concerned about defense, so they deployed a “joint Filipino-American Army” to the Philippines and opened two hospitals on the main island. Hundreds of American military nurses were sent to staff them.

At first, being a nurse in the Philippines was an easy, “routine” job. Nurses mostly cared for the families of officers also deployed to the area, and spent their free time shopping or enjoying the resort-like atmosphere.

None of the nurses had combat training. None of them knew that war was coming.

But World War II did come and the nurses were right where wounded military personnel needed them. It didn’t take long for the women to be overwhelmed by injured soldiers with horrific injuries, missing limbs, and worse.  Not knowing how to care for those kinds of injuries, they learned quickly how to do minor surgeries and how to keep a boy comfortable as he died.

They also learned how to stay safe when the Japanese bombed their hospitals. They learned to protect the wounded, at risk to themselves. And when military officials evacuated civilians from the island, the nurses learned to make do with the meager supplies that remained.

That can-do attitude helped when seventy-nine nurses were captured, along with other troops, by the Japanese in 1942. Taken to Camp O’Donnell in the Philippines, nurses saved as many American lives as they could with the scant resources they had – despite that the nurses themselves suffered terribly from disease and starvation in the POW camps.

Said one of their patients: “’We looked at them like saviors… They were absolutely amazing women.’”

Why isn’t a story like this more widely known?  Author Mary Cronk Farrell asked herself the same question when she first learned of the POW nurses. “Pure Grit” is the result of her curiosity and research.

Through interviews with one former nurse and the children of others, Farrell tells an exciting, often astounding tale that was largely ignored for forty years. Kids, particularly those with parents in the military, may be outraged about that – but beware, because they may likewise be disturbed by the many graphic after-battle descriptions that are here. Those parts surely made me squirm, much as I liked this book.

Still, this is an important story that needs telling and I think 11-to-17-year-old readers will appreciate knowing it. For your future soldier, military fan, or WWII enthusiast of any age, “Pure Grit” will be responsible for a lot of reading.

Terri Schlichenmeyer is based in Wisconsin.

Housing update at GGNA meeting

Greater-Gubser-logo-480x270 Greater-Gubser-logo-480x270

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

The state of the housing market depends on your perspective.

Dana Burk, a principal broker and certified residential specialist with John L. Scott in Salem, gave a real estate update at the most recent Greater Gubser Neighborhood Association (GGNA) meeting.

“One of the biggest questions I get every day is ‘How’s the market?’” Burk said. “It’s specific to each neighborhood. Overall in Salem the market is well. We’re well past the bottom. We bottomed out about a year and a half ago.”

Burk said the average home price in the Salem area rose 13 percent last year, going from $177,231 at the end of 2012 to $200,691 at the end of 2013.

“We have pent up demand and a lack of inventory,” she said. “All of the foreclosures are just starting to hit the market. There are also people wanting to move up. You have younger buyers who feel they will make up costs long-run due to what is happening. The consumer view is that housing is back.”

According to Burk, banks putting foreclosure homes on the market will change the housing market.

“If you’re buying, you might want to wait,” Burk said. “If you’re selling, you might want to sell now.”

Burk said houses are at price levels from nearly a decade ago.

“We peaked in 2007,” she said. “Most people peaked in 2006. We didn’t crash as low as some other places.”

While parts of Salem have a 13-month supply of houses on the market, Burk noted that drops to about five to seven months of supply in Keizer.

“That means we have five months of houses to sell if no other houses come on the market,” she said.

Burk said there have been issues lately with appraisals.

“They are still coming in low,” she said. “If you’re buying it’s a good thing. If you’re selling, it’s not. Some people just quit trying to sell and took their houses off the market. Some people are just starting to put their houses back on the market now.”

Traci Benjamin, a mortgage loan originator with Landmark Professional Mortgage, said paying a little more now on a mortgage loan can pay off.

“If you make an extra $30 a month payment, that saves you a total of 41 payments,” Benjamin said, referring to the life of a loan. “That’s going out to dinner once a month. You will also save more on shorter terms. Going with a 15-year mortgage will save a ton versus going 40 years.”

Both Burk and Benjamin emphasized the need for going with experienced people.

“You want someone who’s been in residential realty for a while,” said Burk, who works alongside her husband. “Make sure you ask (your realtor) how long they’ve been in it. You want someone who is full-time. There are a lot of part-time people out there. A lot will only sell 10 homes a year. We sold 44 homes last year.”

Celtic track teams back for another go

 

Celt Antoine Walder clears the rope in a high jump practice Monday, March 17. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)
Celt Antoine Walder clears the rope in a high jump practice Monday, March 17. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By Evan Rummerfield
For the Keizertimes

Spring sports are in full swing.

More than 100 McNary track and field athletes are now practicing as of March 3. Last year, the boys placed second at the district meet, and the girls ran away with first place – a district title.

Fifteen boys that competed at the varsity district meet last year are returning – 10 of whom are district placers (a placer is an athlete that made it into top eight for an event). Thirteen varsity girls are returning, and seven of them placed at last year’s district meet.

In total, six boys and two girls with state meet experience are returning.

Garrett Hittner, a senior, placed second at the district meet in the 100 meter and third in the 200 meter. He advanced to state in the 100 meter.

Anthony Nguyen, as a freshman last year, placed third in the 100 meter and sixth in the 200 meter at the district meet.

Kyle Torres, a current junior, at the district level placed fifth in the 200 meter and fourth in the 400 meter.

Austin Brown, another returning sophomore, got sixth in the 400 meter.

Last year’s 4×100 meter relay consisted of Hittner, Nguyen, Torres, and Brown. They placed second and then advanced to the state meet.

Three of the four runners on the 4×400 meter relay team are back (Hittner, Torres and Brown).  At the district meet they got third place.

Evan Rummerfield as a junior last year placed fifth in the 800 meter.

Adrian Fernandez as a junior last year placed sixth in the 3,000 meter and seventh in the 1,500 meter.

As a junior Daniel Brattain placed first in the 110 meter hurdles and the 300 meter hurdles; he also took eighth in the javelin. At the state meet, he placed third in the 110 meter hurdles and sixth in the 300 meter hurdles.

At the district meet Chance Hopkins, a senior this year, placed eighth in the 110 meter hurdles.

Tristan Naughton, a junior, got fifth in the shot put at the district level.

Perry Groves, at the district meet placed fifth in high jump and third in the long and triple jump. He qualified for the state meet in long jump and placed eighth at the meet.

Daysha Simms-Garcia, a senior, won district titles in the 200 and 400 meter races. She took fifth in the 400 at the state meet.

As a freshman, Danielle Duran last year placed second in the 400 meter and advanced to state.

Simms-Garcia and Duran are the only returning legs on the girls relay teams. Last year, both the girls 4×100 meter and 4×400 meter team placed first at the district meet.

Aisha Amaitsa as a junior last year got eighth in the 800 meter.

Jasmine Ernest as a sophomore placed seventh in Javelin.

For pole vault, senior Emily McNichols took seventh last year.

Senior Kalah McVay, another pole vault athlete, placed eighth at the district meet.

Ashlee Koenig, a senior, placed seventh in the triple jump.

All of these athletes plan to build off of last year’s successes even though the season lost a week of practice because of a state level change in rules and regulations.

Another tour of Keizer coming?

480x270-Welcome-to-Keizer-sign

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

Is Keizer looking to become the tour town?

For years, Keizer City Councilors have gone on an annual Parks Tour.

Recently the idea was brought forward to have members of the new Keizer Economic Development Commission go on an annual bus tour of Keizer, looking at vacant buildings.

Now another committee has proposed a tour, with sites such as the Claggett Cemetery.

The idea was brought up at the most recent Keizer Points of Interest Committee (KPIC) meeting.

The four members present – the three other seats are vacant and still need to be filled, though one new member will be added at the next meeting – discussed the idea, which deputy city recorder Debbie Lockhart noted had been an idea from councilor Cathy Clark.

“Councilor Clark had said she wanted to have KPIC take council on a tour, like the Parks Tour,” Lockhart said. “You would need to decide where they go. Each of you could choose a place and talk about it.”

KPIC chair Sherrie Gottfried suggested limiting the number of stops on the tour, with council liaison Jim Taylor further suggesting a limit of five stops.

Lockhart suggested the tour be done in the summer and read off the Points of Interest sites from the brochure on the city’s website.

Gottfried suggested eliminating the Art Walk, as well as the Thomas Dove Keizur statue and the Heritage Community Center since both are right at city hall and thus wouldn’t be much of a tour.

Gottfried liked the Marie Dorian exhibit at Keizer Station. Debbie Miller liked the geocache and Taylor liked the donation land claim at the southeast corner of the intersection at Chemawa and River Roads.

After further discussion, each member took a place to show. Gottfried took Claggett Cemetery, Miller took geocaching, Bee Anderson took the donation land claim, Jill Bonney-Hill took the Marie Dorian exhibit and Taylor took some of the historic trees on Rainbow Court.

Taylor suggested the tour take place at 5:15 p.m. on Monday, June 9.

In other recent business:

• Gottfried noted the last week of the month is problematic for her to meet due to other meetings.

Lockhart noted KPIC meetings used to be the third Tuesdays of the month but were moved back at one point to accommodate a then-member. All present members agreed with the idea of moving the meetings back up a week.

KPIC meetings are now at 5:30 p.m. on the third Tuesdays at Keizer Civic Center.

• Bonney-Hill is the new chair, with Anderson the vice chair.

Baseball team starts 1-1

 

 

 

 

 

KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald McNary’s Tristin Mistkawi rushes to make a stop in the Celtics game with Reynolds High School Monday, March 17.
KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald
McNary’s Tristin Mistkawi rushes to make a stop in the Celtics game with Reynolds High School Monday, March 17.

By ERIC A. HOWALD

Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School varsity baseball team stumbled a bit in its first outing Monday, March 17. The Celtics lost 3-1 to Reynolds High School.

McNary struggled to put runners on the bases in the early going. Senior Connor Suing made it to first on a walk in the bottom of the third and stole second but ended the inning stuck there.

“We had too many balls that were not squared up and, as a result, we had way too many weak ground balls,” said Larry Keeker, McNary head coach.

Travis Klampe started the day on the mound and had Reynolds on the ropes with two on and two out in the first, but a line drive to the fence scored two on a triple. Another line drive to the right center outfield scored the third run and Reynolds never looked back. Three defensive errors on the part of McNary in the first didn’t help the cause.

“The seventh inning was a major disappointment at the plate. With a lead-off walk we had a chance to put some pressure on them, but we struck out looking three times in a row,” Keeker said.

Suing got the only McNary run of the game on a RBI by Mickey Walker in the sixth inning.

Klampe pitched four innings with seven strikeouts. Suing closed the contest from the mound allowing just one walk.

Keeker said the game with Reynolds was only a snapshot of the team and there’s lots of ball left to play, but there were lessons they could use moving ahead.

“It was only the first game, and I still believe we have a solid defense,” Keeker said. “We will have to be better at the plate. We need all nine guys contributing with quality at bats. Our mental approach must get better.”

The Celts found their swing in a follow-up game with Silverton High School Tuesday, March 18. McNary had seven hits in a 6-2 win.

Silverton had a 1-0 lead at the bottom of the first, but the Celts returned to the plate for a three-run third inning. The Keizer team padded the lead with two runs in the sixth and one in the eighth.

Tim Hays scored two runs and hit a double. Cole Thomas, Ben Cummings and Hayden Gosling all had RBIs. Walker was the winning pitcher and had eight strikeouts in 5.1 innings.

S-K school board extends search for new head honcho

 

 

Salem-Keizer-SchoolsBy HERB SWETT

For the Keizertimes

The two finalists for superintendent of the Salem-Keizer School District met with members of the public two weeks ago at two middle schools.

The Salem-Keizer School Board decided, after interviewing the finalists for superintendent, to extend the search and interview more candidates.

“In the next few days,” chair Jim Green announced, “we will establish the timeline for the interview process with the goal of having our new superintendent in the district on July 1.”

However, the school board has indicated that it is not close to deciding on a hire. One finalist, Michael Sorum, answered questions at Claggett Creek Middle School on March 10. The other, Janet Schulze, spoke with an audience at Parrish Middle School on March 11.

Sorum, an Oregon native, is chief academic officer of the Fort Worth (Texas) Independent School District. Schulze is assistant superintendent for high schools in the San Francisco Unified School District.

An executive session of the school board followed Schulze’s presentation. Board Chair Jim Green said no decision on the candidates was likely to come very soon.

The board also held a special meeting on personnel actions because it is the time of the year for renewing contracts.

Mat Club shines in region, state

 

 

 

Submitted Jacob Doerfler and Brayden Ebbs show off their state trophies alongside Kelly Hafer, their coach.
Submitted
Jacob Doerfler and Brayden Ebbs show off their state trophies alongside Kelly Hafer, their coach.

By ERIC A. HOWALD

Of the Keizertimes

The McNary High School Mat Club was well-represented in the regional tournament Saturday, March 8.

The team posted four state qualifiers and several top finishers.

Brayden Ebbs took first at 100 pounds; Tony Castaneda took second at 90 pounds; Jacob Doerfler took third at 195 pounds; and Sam Partida took fourth at 117. All four boys qualified for the statewide tournament.

Zach Milstead, at 220 pounds, and Isaiah Putnam, at 160 pounds, placed in the top six. Ian Kramer, at 150 pounds, and Marcus Hess, at 80 pounds, finished in the top eight.

The state qualifiers competed last weekend and Brayden placed second in the 110-pound division; Jacob placed third at 195 pounds; and Tony placed third at 90 pounds.

Whiteaker Middle School placed fifth as a team.

The placings at the state level are the best finish on record for the Celtic Mat Club, said Jason Ebbs, McNary head wrestling coach.

“Despite no organized wrestling program or competitions within the middle schools, we are still producing competitive athletes capable of performing at the state level. All three state placers have been in various mat clubs over the years and training to compete at the higher state and national levels,” Ebbs said.

In recent years, due to budget cuts, wrestling programs at the middle and high school levels have operated on a strictly volunteer basis, and the effect is beginning to show.

“Keizer, at one time, had 40 to 50 wrestlers actively competing at the middle school level at both middle schools. That meant 80 to 100 middle school kids staying after school, learning the sport and training for competition. Unfortunately, we now have very few kids involved anymore,” Ebbs said.

While it means somewhat less prestige for McNary wrestling overall, Ebbs added that the real effects will be felt much more broadly.

“It is nice to still be able to hear about positive stories focused on our kids, and student athletes, but if we don’t get back to supporting these positive outlets – whether it is wrestling, football, volleyball, basketball, etc. – we will see a change in the culture of our schools and community,” he said.

Cops honored for CPR effort

Officer Kevin DeMarco and Sgt. Jeff Goodman (far left) were honored Monday for performing CPR on Margaret Whitehouse (center) in January. (KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy)
Officer Kevin DeMarco and Sgt. Jeff Goodman (far left) were honored Monday for performing CPR on Margaret Whitehouse (center) in January.
(KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy)

 

By CRAIG MURPHY
Of the Keizertimes

He didn’t do it for the honor or recognition.

But Monday night sure felt good to Sgt. Jeff Goodman with the Keizer Police Department.

Goodman and officer Kevin DeMarco were feted at the start of Monday’s Keizer City Council meeting for their actions exactly two months earlier.

On Jan. 17, Goodman and DeMarco were the first responders to a call of Keizer resident Margaret Whitehouse being unconscious and not breathing. The two began doing chest compressions and rescue breathing on Margaret until medics from the Keizer Fire District arrived.

The efforts paid off, as Margaret’s life was saved. As such, police chief John Teague presented Goodman and DeMarco with Lifesaving Awards.

A beaming Margaret had a front row seat to watch the short ceremony, flanked by son Robert Whitehouse and partner June Akers.

“It’s the greatest honor I’ve ever had,” Goodman said. “It’s not everyday you do something that makes a big difference in someone’s life.”

Before the meeting started, Margaret got to meet the men who saved her life – but this time in a much more enjoyable situation.

“They are incredible,” said Margaret, whose wide smile didn’t leave her face all night. “They didn’t give up.”

Once Margaret heard of the ceremony, it was her top priority to be present.

“I wouldn’t miss it for nothing,” she said.

DeMarco said everything lined up just right to be able to help Margaret in January.

“It was definitely special,” DeMarco said. “A lot of things happen for a reason. We were in the right place at the right time. We were able to render aid until paramedics arrived. This gives a different meaning for the training we go through.”

Teague noted who highlighted the good deed.

“It is important to note that this was brought to my attention by the Keizer Fire District,” said Teague, who noted members of both the KFD and KPD were present. “Frankly, saving lives is routine work for Keizer medics, so their recognition of these officers’ actions is especially meaningful. Sergeant Goodman’s and officer DeMarco’s actions are a tribute to good training and good instincts.”

Robert Whitehouse spoke for the family.

“I just want to say thank you to the two officers,” he said. “Their timely decisions to continue doing CPR on my mother saved her life. Words cannot tell how grateful and how appreciative we are of everything you guys do, so thank you very much.”

such, police chief John Teague presented Goodman and DeMarco with Lifesaving Awards.

A beaming Margaret had a front row seat to watch the short ceremony, flanked by son Robert Whitehouse and partner June Akers.

“It’s the greatest honor I’ve ever had,” Goodman said. “It’s not everyday you do something that makes a big difference in someone’s life.”

Before the meeting, Margaret met the men who saved her life – but this time in a much more enjoyable situation.

“They are incredible,” said Margaret, whose wide smile didn’t leave her face all night. “They didn’t give up.”

Once Margaret heard of the ceremony, it was her top priority to be present.

“I wouldn’t miss it for nothing,” she said.

DeMarco said everything lined up just right to be able to help Margaret in January.

“It was definitely special,” DeMarco said. “A lot of things happen for a reason. We were in the right place at the right time. We were able to render aid until paramedics arrived. This gives a different meaning for the training we go through.”

Teague noted who highlighted the good deed.

“It is important to note that this was brought to my attention by the Keizer Fire District,” said Teague, who noted members of both the KFD and KPD were present. “Frankly, saving lives is routine work for Keizer medics, so their recognition of these officers’ actions is especially meaningful. Sergeant Goodman’s and officer DeMarco’s actions are a tribute to good training and good instincts.”

Robert Whitehouse spoke for the family.

“I just want to say thank you to the two officers,” he said. “Their timely decisions to continue doing CPR on my mother saved her life. Words cannot tell how grateful and how appreciative we are of everything you guys do, so thank you very much.”