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Author: Admin

Dear mom and dad: cool it

By KARISSA NIEHOFF and
PETER WEBER
If you are the mother or father of a high school athlete in Oregon, this message is primarily for you.
When you attend an athletic event that involves your son or daughter, cheer to your heart’s content, enjoy the camaraderie that high school sports offer and have fun. But when it comes to verbally criticizing game officials or coaches, cool it.
Make no mistake about it. Your passion is admired, and your support of the hometown team is needed. But so is your self-control. Yelling, screaming and berating the officials humiliates your child, annoys those sitting around you, embarrasses your child’s school and is the primary reason Oregon has an alarming shortage of high school officials.
It’s true. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Sports Officials, more than 75 percent of all high school officials say “adult behavior” is the primary reason they quit. And 80 percent of all young officials hang up their stripes after just two years of whistle blowing. Why? They don’t need your abuse.
Plus, there’s a ripple effect. There are more officials over 60 than under 30 in many areas. And as older, experienced officials retire, there aren’t enough younger ones to replace them. If there are no officials, there are no games. The shortage of licensed high school officials is severe enough in some areas that athletic events are being postponed or cancelled—especially at the freshman and junior varsity levels.
Research confirms that participation in high school sports and activities instills a sense of pride in school and community, teaches lifelong lessons like the value of teamwork and self-discipline and facilitates the physical and emotional development of those who participate. So, if the games go away because there aren’t enough men and women to officiate them, the loss will be infinitely greater than just an “L” on the scoreboard. It will be putting a dent in your community’s future.
If you would like to be a part of the solution to the shortage of high school officials, you can sign up to become a licensed official at HighSchoolOfficials.com. Otherwise, adult role models at high school athletic events here in Oregon are always welcome.
(Karissa Niehoff is executive director of the National Federation of State High School Associations; Peter Weber is executive director of the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA.)

By KARISSA NIEHOFF and
PETER WEBER
If you are the mother or father of a high school athlete in Oregon, this message is primarily for you.
When you attend an athletic event that involves your son or daughter, cheer to your heart’s content, enjoy the camaraderie that high school sports offer and have fun. But when it comes to verbally criticizing game officials or coaches, cool it.
Make no mistake about it. Your passion is admired, and your support of the hometown team is needed. But so is your self-control. Yelling, screaming and berating the officials humiliates your child, annoys those sitting around you, embarrasses your child’s school and is the primary reason Oregon has an alarming shortage of high school officials.
It’s true. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Sports Officials, more than 75 percent of all high school officials say “adult behavior” is the primary reason they quit. And 80 percent of all young officials hang up their stripes after just two years of whistle blowing. Why? They don’t need your abuse.
Plus, there’s a ripple effect. There are more officials over 60 than under 30 in many areas. And as older, experienced officials retire, there aren’t enough younger ones to replace them. If there are no officials, there are no games. The shortage of licensed high school officials is severe enough in some areas that athletic events are being postponed or cancelled—especially at the freshman and junior varsity levels.
Research confirms that participation in high school sports and activities instills a sense of pride in school and community, teaches lifelong lessons like the value of teamwork and self-discipline and facilitates the physical and emotional development of those who participate. So, if the games go away because there aren’t enough men and women to officiate them, the loss will be infinitely greater than just an “L” on the scoreboard. It will be putting a dent in your community’s future.
If you would like to be a part of the solution to the shortage of high school officials, you can sign up to become a licensed official at HighSchoolOfficials.com. Otherwise, adult role models at high school athletic events here in Oregon are always welcome.
(Karissa Niehoff is executive director of the National Federation of State High School Associations; Peter Weber is executive director of the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA.)

By KARISSA NIEHOFF and
PETER WEBER
If you are the mother or father of a high school athlete in Oregon, this message is primarily for you.
When you attend an athletic event that involves your son or daughter, cheer to your heart’s content, enjoy the camaraderie that high school sports offer and have fun. But when it comes to verbally criticizing game officials or coaches, cool it.
Make no mistake about it. Your passion is admired, and your support of the hometown team is needed. But so is your self-control. Yelling, screaming and berating the officials humiliates your child, annoys those sitting around you, embarrasses your child’s school and is the primary reason Oregon has an alarming shortage of high school officials.
It’s true. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Sports Officials, more than 75 percent of all high school officials say “adult behavior” is the primary reason they quit. And 80 percent of all young officials hang up their stripes after just two years of whistle blowing. Why? They don’t need your abuse.
Plus, there’s a ripple effect. There are more officials over 60 than under 30 in many areas. And as older, experienced officials retire, there aren’t enough younger ones to replace them. If there are no officials, there are no games. The shortage of licensed high school officials is severe enough in some areas that athletic events are being postponed or cancelled—especially at the freshman and junior varsity levels.
Research confirms that participation in high school sports and activities instills a sense of pride in school and community, teaches lifelong lessons like the value of teamwork and self-discipline and facilitates the physical and emotional development of those who participate. So, if the games go away because there aren’t enough men and women to officiate them, the loss will be infinitely greater than just an “L” on the scoreboard. It will be putting a dent in your community’s future.
If you would like to be a part of the solution to the shortage of high school officials, you can sign up to become a licensed official at HighSchoolOfficials.com. Otherwise, adult role models at high school athletic events here in Oregon are always welcome.
(Karissa Niehoff is executive director of the National Federation of State High School Associations; Peter Weber is executive director of the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA.)

Kudos to cleaners

To the Editor:

A great big thank you is in order for the volunteers of the Keizer Cultural Center. Last Saturday, volunteers from the (Keizer Community Library, Homegrown Theatre, Keizer Art Association and the Keizer Heritage Museum) rolled up their sleeves, grabbed cleaning supplies and worked together to make short work of sprucing up Keizer’s old school house.  The cleaning was a prelude to touch-up painting of the interior and the volunteers made short work of the project.  The Keizer Cultural Center organizations are totally operated by volunteers, with no paid staff, and it is gratifying to see them pitch in to help preserve this special historical building.

Gayle McMurria Bachik
Keizer
(The writer is the chair of the Oversight Committee.)

Troy Franklin Kannier

April 18, 1964 – January 2, 2019

 Troy Franklin Kannier, a wonderful husband and father, dedicated and loyal brother, sincere and caring friend, and really, really great pizza maker passed away Jan. 2. He was 54.

T. Kannier

His spirit is carried on by his wife Trista, sons Hudson and Grayson, siblings Lisa, Lori and Travis, 12 nieces and nephews and an extended family of friends and relations from every walk of life.

A man’s man, Troy was a connoisseur of life, loving great music and great food, strong drinks and easy mornings. Full of common sense, he understood that nothing was over until, well, until it was over. He worked hard and dedicated himself to doing whatever he did in the best way possible, be it father, husband, boss or friend.

To see Troy sit with his unnerving smirk (a thing his friends know well) and watch him watch Trista play with Hudson and Grayson was to observe the inward smile of a contented man; in awe, in love and in the only place he really wanted to be: at home with his family.

While the name, Troy Kannier might not be familiar to many in the Salem−Keizer area, Padington’s Pizza most likely is and if you know Padington’s, you know Troy. He grew up in the family business making pizzas alongside his father, George, eventually fulfilling his dream of becoming a husband, father and small business owner. He did all these with excitement and pride until an unforeseen fork in the road presented itself.

Two-and-a-half years ago, Troy was with glioblastoma brain cancer. Together, Troy and Trista fought the battle in the only way the two of them knew how, with all of the strength, ferocity and courage they could muster. Along the way there have been many days filled with music, sunshine and laughter and there were days with tears that fell like rain. The fight finally came to an end. 

Trista, Hudson and Grayson carry on the legacy of one hell of a man.  The memory of his sparkling eyes, quick smile and wonderful wit will give them comfort in the days to come.  Troy will be missed.

Services were held at St. Joeseph Catholic Church on Saturday, Jan. 12.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Swedish Neuroscience Institute  www.swedishfoundation.org

Turning the page

By Lyndon Zaitz

For all intents and purposes 2018 is finished. All that is left to do is to declare our resolutions and ring in the new year. 

Some would say that 2018 was a less than stellar year, both nationally and internationally. But 2018 was a great year for those who married, became parents, graduated from school, received a huge promotion and raise or moved into a new house. 

There is nothing so promising as a new year, A clean slate awaits us to write our plans, dreams and wishes upon. The gloom of winter really can’t compare to the optimism we can bring with each new day.  Though some animals hibernate during winter, we humans can’t stay in a warm, cozy bed for two or three months. Whether we like it or not, life comes at us every morning. Obligations, duties and responsibilities await us. Many animals hibernate in winter, but we humans cannot stay in a warm, cozy bed for two or three months and wait for warm spring days. 

I have found changing one’s nest is a very good cure-all for winter blues. When I  need a change, a rearranging of furniture and a purging of storage goes a long way to give me a new perspective.

When we find ourselves in a day to day routine that seems more arduous because of the gray, cold winter weather, a change will do the pysche good. It’s too wet and cold to do any major gardening this time of year. Look inward. Make changes just for sake of change—rearrange the photos on your walls, switch the sofa around, move the television to a different room. The best thing? You don’t need anyone’s permission to do that.

If your home, however, is practically perfect in every way, there may be other changes during winter. For those with the means to get a taste of the tropics during winter, good for you. For those without the means, there are volunteer opportunities abounding in the community.

Barring a change of scene, the winter months are prime time for improvement. Simple chores such as washing all the interior windows will pay off when spring’s first rays of sun start streaming through. Or, go into the den and update your resume, go through files and discard what is not needed.

Spring is a new of renewal but getting the process started early in mid-winter is very cathartic. And you’ll face 2019 with courage and optimism. After all, the future belongs to those who plan for it.

(Lyndon Zaitz is publisher of the Keizertimes)

‘Drained’ federal agencies are swampier than ever

Throughout his campaign for president, Donald J. Trump promised time and again that he would drain the “swamp.”  The swamp Trump referenced was the imagined one in Washington, D.C., where all the old freeloaders and deadbeats lived off the public purse but produced nothing but large guts and bad ideas.

Trump said he’d do something about the malingers by appointing really good people to his administration’s cabinet posts and other senior positions.  So, they were one by one given the top jobs in the White House but soon enough were recognized as not only among the poor examples they replaced from previous administrations but were found to be even worse than their predecessors from as far back as any living Americans could remember.

Two of the worst violators and among those early-on to be pointed to the nearest exit were Health and Human Service Secretary Tom Price and Environmental Protection Agency Chief Scott Pruitt.  Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has remained in his job but will soon follow his former associates.  Zinke, a former Montana congressman, has borne a remarkable resemblance to Pruitt in his approach to established policy standards: fit for them to break.

Zinke has become notorious in a mere two years at accumulating about a dozen inquiries into his manipulation of public resources for private use.  By dismantling rules that have protected the nation’s wilderness and wildlife, he had led the way for others who seek to rape by his guidance and encouragement all that environmentalists and naturalists have worked for the past 100 years to establish and protect.

According to the Center for Western Priorities, there have been many investigations by the Interior Department’s inspector general and other environmental groups.  Several of Zinke’s GOP predecessors, who sought to privatize through personal business interests the country’s many wildlife refuges, parks, monuments, and public lands, never came anywhere near the list of Zinke’s achieved turnovers.

Recently, the inspector general opened another investigation into Zinke’s role in a Montana land deal involving the chairman of Halliburton.  The oil services company also stands to benefit from such policies as what have been Zinke’s apparent disregard for state interests in preservation through his efforts to expand offshore drilling, including Oregon’s border to the Pacific Ocean.

He has dismissed the recreational value of protected lands and done was he could to exploit them for his wealthy pals.  Examples include logging in the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument on the California-Oregon border.  Then, too, Zinke has worked to terminate endangered species protections.

Zinke has labored to turn over public lands and formerly protected areas to use by mining, golf course, hunting, oil and gas exploration interests and any other way persons of wealth and corporations can take down trees, fill the lakes and streams by leveling the surrounding hills and mountains, and kill the wildlife.  Wish it were possible for this writer to report faith in the replacements for Price, Pruitt and Zinke bringing security to the many features of America we appreciate.  Likely unsettling to some Americans, “rescues” may have a chance only with new leadership at the top and a real draining of the “swamp.”

(Gene H. McIntyre shares his
opinion frequently in the Keizertimes)

If convictions equal success

By LARRY ELDER

President Donald Trump-haters salivated over special counsel Robert Mueller’s recent filings on ex-Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and Trump former lawyer/”fixer” Michael Cohen. In both cases, Mueller recommends lengthy sentences, having accused them of committing crimes, including, in the case of Cohen, that Trump directed him to violate campaign finance laws in paying off porn star Stormy Daniels and Playboy Playmate Karen McDougal.

If true, is an impeachable offense? 

In 2013, the Federal Election Commission leveled a $375,000 fine against President Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign for failing to properly report almost $2 million in 2008 campaign contributions, along with other violations. No criminal prosecutions. Nobody went to jail.

In the case of President Trump’s former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who pled guilty to lying to the FBI, the special counsel recommends no jail time. Flynn, according to the filing, gave the probe “substantial assistance.” The filing described Flynn as “one of the few people with long-term and firsthand insight” into Mueller’s investigation. But did Flynn give evidence of a Trump “collusion” or conspiracy with Russia to win the election—the purpose the Mueller investigation? So far, the investigation has resulted in the convictions of several Trump associates. Not one of the convictions, however, has had anything to do with a Trump-Russian “collusion.” 

If the definition of a successful special counsel or special prosecutor is the number of convictions he or she obtains, then the Whitewater investigation into an allegedly crooked Arkansas real-estate deal and a crooked Little Rock bank was an unmitigated success. True, that probe’s big targets, Bill and Hillary Clinton, were not charged, but the investigation resulted in 14 convictions, including the then-governor of Arkansas.

Webster Hubbell, Hillary Clinton’s former law partner at Little Rock’s Rose Law Firm, was convicted. Hubbell, at the beginning of the probe, held the No. 3 position in the Justice Department. He admitted to stealing from clients and partners of his law firm and pled guilty to mail fraud and tax evasion. He was sentenced to 21 months in prison. He was later indicted on an additional 18 charges after resigning from the DOJ. The New York Times reported: “Some money Hubbell received in 1994, for which the prosecutor said he did ‘little or no work,’ might have been given to discourage him from being more candid with investigators. … Much of the income Hubbell received in 1994 came from contracts arranged by close friends and supporters of the Clintons, suggesting to investigators that Hubbell may have been given money to discourage him from cooperating with the Whitewater independent counsel’s office.”

James McDougal, Clinton friend and Whitewater business partner, operated Madison Guaranty Savings and Loan, the bank under investigation. Madison failed in 1989, costing taxpayers $60 million. McDougal was convicted of 18 felony counts related to bad loans made by his bank. After his conviction, McDougal agreed to cooperate with the special prosecutor. 

Susan McDougal, James McDougal’s former wife, was a partner in the Whitewater land deal and in Madison Guaranty. She was convicted of four felony fraud counts, but refused to cooperate with the Whitewater prosecutors. McDougal was sentenced to 18 months in jail on a civil contempt charge, but still has refused to answer questions before a grand jury. She was later charged with criminal contempt and obstruction of justice. President Clinton gave her a full pardon in the final hours of his presidency.

Hillary Clinton called her husband a victim of a “vast right-wing conspiracy.” Bill Clinton adviser Paul Begala called independent counsel Ken Starr “corrupt” and his investigation a “witch hunt” and “a scuzzy investigation” based on “leaks and lies and manufactured evidence.” Clinton senior strategist Rahm Emanuel complained of the “partisan pursuit of the president.” The difference is that the Whitewater convictions, as opposed to the Mueller probe convictions at this point, specifically related to the purpose of the probe. 

Clearly, some Trump associates broke laws, and real-estate developer Trump perhaps made misleading statements about a proposed deal for a real-estate project in Russia. But since virtually every political pundit predicted Trump’s landslide defeat in 2016, why the surprise that Trump was simultaneously working on his next act? As for the accusation that Trump directed Cohen to make payments to prevent his relationships with Daniels and McDougal from coming to light during the campaign, what happened to the Bill Clinton defense —“Everybody lies about sex”? Trump critics simultaneously called him an idiot and the conductor of a scheme intended to break campaign finance laws by using his own money to pay off mistresses. 

The Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Counsel, in 2000, wrote, “The indictment or criminal prosecution of a sitting President would unconstitutionally undermine the capacity of the executive branch to perform its constitutionally assigned functions.” The recourse is impeachment and then removal from office, following a trial in the Senate. Unless the Mueller report contains a lot more than what we know, so far, neither is likely.

(Creators Syndicate)

2019 Legislature convenes in 3 weeks

from the capitol
By BILL POST

Well Happy New Year! I hope your holidays have been full of peace and harmony. I’m taking the time to enjoy the season and embrace a little quiet before the new year comes. The 2019 legislative session starts on January 14. This is the earliest the legislature has ever begun as the new constitutional end of session date is June 30. This is a nice and welcome change so that members can enjoy Independence Day with their families. 

Even with being in the super-minority, I’m looking forward to serving in the 80th legislature as I just found out I will be serving on the House Committee on Judiciary and the House Committee on Agriculture and Land Use as vice chair. All committee assignments are made by Speaker of the House Tina Kotek. The Committee on Agriculture and Land Use is a new committee formed by the Speaker. I’m excited to serve on this committee so that I can better advocate for my agriculture friends. Seven members have been assigned to this committee, four Democrats and three Republicans. It really should be a fun group and I trust we will do good work for rural communities.  As you know, House District 25 (Keizer to St. Paul to Newberg) is very much a heavy agricultural district with farms between and around each of those communities. From my first term to now I have always promised to look out for and defend our farmers as they are under more and more pressures that can significantly change their livelihoods and eventually change how we as citizens live and thrive in Oregon. I am very much anticipating much good will be done via this committee for the farmers, ranchers and dairies in our district.

This will be my third term serving on the House Committee on Judiciary. This is one of the toughest committees to sit on as the majority of the bills goes through this committee and issues are very complex. I thoroughly enjoy being on this committee as I ask the simple questions in the room that no one else wants to ask, but everyone is thinking. Basically, I make sure everyone who is watching knows what is actually being discussed. Eleven members have been assigned to this committee, seven democrats and four republicans. It should be an interesting session, as many controversial topics are expected to come to the Judiciary Committee. I hope to be your voice on that committee, expressing the values that House District 25 believes in and the reason why you elected me to represent you.

As always, please feel free to stop by my office during session any time. I love welcoming constituents to the Capitol. Have a great rest of your holiday season!

(Bill Post represents House Dis- trict 25. He can be reached at 503- 986-1425 or via email at rep. bil- [email protected] oregonlegislature.gov.)

Katherine Fraser Jackmond

May 11, 1933 – December 17, 2018

On December 17, with family holding her hand, Katherine Fraser Jackmond, a beloved Mom and Grannie, passed away. 

K. Jackmond

Katherine was born and raised in Portland, Ore.,  by parents Bill and Peggy Miller. A graduate of Grant High School and Oregon State University, she was active in Alpha Phi and yearbook with her smiling face in a group photo on the back of the 1952 Beaver. 

In 1955, she married Bryant Jackmond and lived in various cities around the state while Bryant was working his way up in Oregon Department of Transportation. They were married for 61 years and had three children, Chris (Debralee), Patti, and Sandy. She is survived by son Chris and daughter Patti, grandchildren Andrea (her first prize), Westin, Lee, Alex and Alyssa, great-grandchildren Cheyanne, Aidan, Liam, Lilly and Chloe. She is predeceased by her parents, brother Bill, and daughter Sandy. 

Katherine was a recycler before there was the word and was Salem’s Recycler of the Year in 2012. A Master Gardener, devoted bridge player, and singer (Sweet Adelines and church choir) she was also a lifelong learner instilling her passion for nature (4-H Entomology leader) and literature onto her children and grandchildren. She could hear a phrase and break into song. She enjoyed reciting poetry with her animated voice. We all recall The Walrus and the Carpenter. She and Bryant attended plays at the Shakespeare Festival for more than 50 years. She was a volunteer at Salem Hospital and Bush House Auxiliary for more than 20 years and an active member of American Association of University Women.

A trusting and innocent soul with a beautiful smile and kind heart. She loved and was loved by so many nieces, nephews and great friends. 

A celebration of life will be on Saturday, January 5 at 11:00 at Keizer Clear Lake United Methodist Church, 7920 Wheatland Rd., Keizer.. 

 In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Church or Union Gospel Mission. 

Museum volunteers spread history of Keizer and more

By LYNDON A. ZAITZ
Of the Keizertimes

The Keizer community offers many opportunities for volunteerism. There are non-profit organizations that serve a specific clientele, there are commissions and task forces with city government. There are countless opportunities for the public to give of their time with our schools, from elementary to high.

One of the more unique volunteer opportunities is at the Keizer Heritage Museum at the Keizer Cultural Center, housed in the original Keizer School built in 1916 and that now sits on the Keizer Civic Center campus on Chemawa Road NE.

The museum is the repository for Keizer’s history, dating back to the mid-1800s. There are permanent exhibits that are joined by temporary exhibits as well as a research center. The research center is named for one the museum’s longest serving volunteers and supporter—Evelyn Melson Franz. Though Franz has stepped away from any day-to-day operations, she visits often.

One of the current volunteers serves as a museum host two days each month. Ray Gordene Lane has been volunteering at the museum for so long she doesn’t remember when she started.

Lane, a retired kindergarten teacher and school librarian, has been a Keizer resident since the early 2000s. She has a history of volunteering from a tour guide at a Eugene museum and as policy chairperson for the Keizer/Salem Area Seniors.

“Answer questions from visitors,” said Lane when asked what she does as a volunteer. Interacting with museum visitors is one of the attractions (and benefits) for her as a host. “I meet lots of interesting people,” she added.

When she began volunteering at the museum she knew very little about Keizer and its history. By poring over the exhibits, reading the books about Keizer, Lane has learned about the man the city was named for (Thomas Dove Keizur) as well as Charles McNary (U.S. Senator) who lived in a house where McNary Golf Club now sits.

“I always recommend volunteering,” she said. “It is not a hard job (as a host at the museum)—it’s only hard when people don’t come in.”

The Keizer Heritage Museum, operated by the Keizer Heritage Foundation, is seeking to open the museum more hours and is recruiting volunteer hosts for two to three hour shifts. Currently the museum’s hours are 2-4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. A volunteer can take as few or as many shifts as they like.

Each volunteer is given a thorough tour of the museum, its exhibits and its research center. As host, a volunteer’s toughest job is to persuade visitors to sign in the visitors book. Gordene Lane has found her niche as a volunteer and makes the museum her home for four hours each month.

McNary sweeps West Salem in dual meet

By MATT RAWLINGS
Of the Keizertimes

Early into the Mountain Valley Conference season, it’s clear that the McNary High School swim team is a force to be reckoned with.

The Celtics swept their dual meet for the second straight week with West Salem being the victim this time around. McNary’s boys squad took down the Titans by a score of 103-47 while the girls team came out on top with a 83-72 win on Thursday, Dec. 13 at the Kroc Center.

McNary junior Eloisa Moreno swims the freestyle portion of the 200 individual medley in a meet from earlier this season. (KEIZERTIMES/Matt Rawlings)

Even though both victories were impressive, McNary head coach Casey Lewin was more pumped about the win for the girls — especially since they were without one of their top swimmers in Alyssa Garvey, who is currently rehabbing an injury.

“It was a big accomplishment. They were so excited to win because West (Salem) is a really strong program, especially on the girls side,” Lewin said. “We know how good West is, so to come out and get a win when we’re not at full strength was huge.”

With Garvey out of the lineup, a pair of freshmen were able to step up in her absence.

McNary’s Kaylynn Villalobos knocked off the higher-seeded Callie Luth from West Salem in the 50-yard freestyle with a winning time of 27.63. Villalobos was also victorious in the 100-backstroke  (1:09.01).

The Celtics other freshman star, Paris Boyd, won the 100-breaststroke by more than 10 seconds (1:16.21).

Both swimmers also played big roles in McNary’s victory in the 200-individual medley relay.

“It’s awesome having freshmen be so successful because they’re only going to get stronger and faster,” Casey said. “And having young talent like that helps motivate the other kids as well. They see where the bar is at and it makes everyone better.”

Alex Beard was the other individual winner for the McNary girls with her win in the 200-IM (2:22.12).

On the boys side, it would have been difficult for McNary to dominate more than they did. The Celtics won 10 of the 11 varsity races and only surrendered a defeat in the 200-free.

“It’s not just a small handful of guys that are swimming well right now. It’s a total team effort,” Lewin said about the success of the boys team.

McNary’s Kyle Hooper easily won both the 200-IM (2:10.69) and the 100-butterfly (1:00.72). Harrison Vaughn was the first-place finisher in 500-free (5:19.69) and the 100-breast (1:10.58) for the Celtics.

Along with Hooper and Vaughn, Jabez Rhoades also won a pair of events in this meet. Rhoades finished first in the 50-free (24.95) and the 100-free (57.74) and swam some of the best times of his career.

“I just came out and swam fast,” Rhoades said. “That was the fastest I’ve ever swam in a race that wasn’t at districts.”

Jackson McCarthy rounded out McNary’s individual victories with his first-place finish in the 100-back.